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Law Legislation

  • The Supreme Court Monday rejected a tobacco industry appeal on two issues in a Florida class-action case that has already resulted in a $145 billion punitive award against the cigarette makers being overturned.

  • The European Commission said on Monday it had decided to open formal anti-trust proceedings against Qualcomm over the U.S. company's patent licensing rates for third-generation mobile telephones.

  • A New York Jets season-ticket holder filed a class-action lawsuit Friday against the New England Patriots and coach Bill Belichick for "deceiving customers."

  • The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued Bloomberg LP on Thursday, alleging the news service had discriminated against pregnant employees by cutting their pay and demoting them.

  • Siemens's review of corruption allegations has identified more than 1.5 billion euros ($2.1 billion) in suspicious payments dating back 10 to 12 years, sources close to its supervisory board said on Thursday.

  • A union filed a shareholder lawsuit against Moody's on Wednesday claiming the rating agency did not tell investors it "assigned excessively high ratings" to bonds backed by subprime mortgages.

  • A California appeals court on Tuesday declined to reinstate a long-running case against the Walt Disney over royalties it paid for its popular Winnie the Pooh character.

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    No matter what happens with the New York Knicks sexual harassment trial, the fans won't turn away. All the crisis PR people who keep going on television and talking to the newspapers, whining that the Knicks "brand" is getting damaged, should challenge themselves to come up with a number of people they think will not renew their season tickets solely because of this.

  • Four out of five businesses worldwide have been hurt by some type of corporate fraud in the last three years, according to a survey commissioned by risk consultant Kroll.

  • A European Union proposal to stop people from accessing bomb-making instructions online is fraught with technical difficulties, if not downright unworkable, Internet practitioners say.

  • Apple

    Apple Chief Executive Steve Jobs was asked by U.S. securities regulators to give a deposition in a lawsuit against the company's former general counsel involving stock options backdating, Bloomberg reported, citing two people familiar with the matter.

  • A shareholder in BAE Systems has filed a lawsuit against the British defense company's board and other individuals which seeks damages stemming from past arms deals with Saudi Arabia.

  • A federal appeals court on Tuesday upheld a Delaware judge's rejection of billionaire investor Kirk Kerkorian's claims that he was defrauded in the 1998 merger of DaimlerBenz and Chrysler.

  • Microsoft may find it hard to appeal a landmark decision from the European Union Court of First Instance to uphold a European Commission anti-trust fine, because it sets important precedents for EU competition issues, officials said Monday.

  • Yesterday, I blogged that messages to each of David Maris' lawyers seeking comment on Biovail "dropping" or "settling" its case against the former Bank of America Securities analyst had gone without a response. Well, this morning I got this email from one of his attorneys tossing the ball back in Biovail's court:

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    The New York Post broke the news today that Biovail Corporation, Canada's biggest biotech, is dropping its lawsuit against a hedge fund, a research outlet, Bank of America Securities and its former specialty pharmaceuticals analyst David Maris. "60 Minutes" did a piece on the lawsuits last year. Shortly after being sued, Maris left B of A. He and the company never disclosed..

  • Narin Leininger knows about the risks of talking on a cell phone or sending text messages while driving. The 16-year-old high school junior says he'd only use his phone behind the wheel in an emergency -- a flat tire, traffic jam or crash.

  • Asia-Pacific leaders said on Sunday they saw "real progress" in world trade talks now underway in Geneva and pledged flexibility and the political will to forge a deal by the end of 2007.

  • The U.S. Congress is looking into Mattel's procedures for alerting federal regulators about hazardous toys, The Wall Street Journal reported in its online edition Friday.

  • The independence of the credit-rating agencies came under fire in the aftermath of recent mortgage-market turmoil as regulators plan to investigate how the companies are paid, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.