Law Legislation

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    New Jersey is the latest state where some legislators would like to ban text messaging while driving, sending a message to BlackBerry addicts who may have found a way to stay productive while sidelined by a traffic jam.

  • The chief executive of oil company Total was held for a second day of questioning Thursday in an investigation into the group's activities in Iran, while two other executives were released with no charges filed, the company said.

  • Former dot-com mogul Takafumi Horie was found guilty of securities laws violations and sentenced to two-and-a-half years in prison on Friday, in a case that has come to symbolize the challenges Japan faces in policing rising startups.

  • Two former managers of German industrial group Siemens denied charges of breach of trust and bribery but acknowledged making payments to employees of Italy's Enel to secure gas-turbines contracts.

  • Sen. Charles Grassley filed the legislation as an amendment to a Homeland Security bill now being debated by the Senate.

  • If content is king, there's bitter dissention brewing in the online kingdom, with Microsoft launching later this morning a new front in its assault against Google. Microsoft's associate general counsel Thomas Rubin will deliver a blistering attack on Google to the American Association of Publishers at a meeting in New York City later this morning....

  • The European Commission turned up the pressure on Microsoft on Thursday, warning the U.S. software giant of new fines and accusing it of serial defiance of an antitrust ruling made nearly three years ago.

  • Germany's Cabinet on Wednesday approved a plan to ban smoking on public transport and in federal buildings, but left open the possibility of special rooms being set aside for smokers.

  • Microsoft on Thursday lost the first of six patent lawsuits brought by Paris-based telecom equipment maker Alcatel-Lucent, and a federal district court jury set damages at $1.5 billion.

  • The Supreme Court is ready to hear from lawyers from Microsoft and AT&T as it considers a long-running patent dispute between the industry giants.

  • The fate of a higher federal minimum wage for the lowest paid workers no longer depends on whether small businesses will get tax breaks. The pending question is the size of the breaks.

  • Beyonce Knowles

    Sports Illustrated chooses Beyoncé to grace the cover of its swimsuit issue. Major League Baseball deals with another fight over a World Series last-out ball. Vegas bookie picks English springer spaniel to win best in show.

  • Google lost a copyright lawsuit Tuesday to Belgian newspapers that had demanded it remove headlines and links to news stories posted without their permission. The ruling, if confirmed, could set a precedent for how Web search engines link to copyrighted material in the tumultuous arena of online news.

  • Google was criticized by a group of major media companies for deliberately providing Internet traffic to Web sites accused of offering illegal film downloads, according to several people familiar with the matter, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday.

  • Cities across the country are rushing to go wireless – it’s cheaper to install, cheaper for users than cable, much faster than dial-up and generally more cost-effective all around. Yet municipalities are running into opposition as they attempt to transform their cities into Wi-Fi hotspots.

  • A payment from animation studio Pixar, thought to have been arranged by Steve Jobs, to the film director John Lasseter, is raising concerns that it included improperly backdated stock options, The Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

  • The bizarre story of the NASA astronaut who is charged with trying to kill a romantic rival over a love triangle is unfolding almost as if it were the plot of a TV soap opera. The love-struck mother of three is back in Texas today, a day after being charged in Florida with trying to murder the woman she believed was her romantic rival for a space shuttle pilot's affections.  But this true story brings up an interesting real world question; if this can happen at NASA, (which has arguably the best talent in the world) what is keeping it from happening in corporate America?

  • As CNBC.com reported earlier today, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is investigating whether or not some Wall Street banks are leaking privy information from one client to gain favor with another. But is this illegal? Depends upon whom you talk to.

  • Now that President George W. Bush has submitted his $2.9-trillion, fiscal-2008 budget, Congress will debate just how much money will actually be spent – and which programs will get that money. But as legislators search for ways to finance their spending agendas, more and more of them are looking to the “tax gap” as the pot of gold they need. But is it?

  • Gov. Rick Perry of Texas recently ordered that all girls entering the sixth grade in that state be vaccinated against cervical cancer. The mandate has become a source of controversy from more than one angle. Does a governor have the right to make such an order? Is the vaccine safe? Could it promote sexual promiscuity? What role does Merck – the company that developed and produces the vaccine – play in all this?