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  • Apple's former finance chief said on Tuesday he relied on Chief Executive Steve Jobs in the handling of backdated stock options, putting the spotlight on the company's co-founder inthe scandal.

  • Microsoft has responded to European Union allegations that it is overcharging rivals for information that would make their products work better with Windows. The software maker also repeated its request for more guidance on what regulators consider to be an acceptable price.

  • Demand for a free vaccine against cervical cancer is outstripping supply in New Hampshire, which was the first state in the country to approve free distribution of the vaccine, which protects girls against four strains of a sexually transmitted infection called human papillomavirus, or HPV.

  • The World Bank's board on Friday ordered an ad hoc group to discuss the fate of President Paul Wolfowitz, whose leadership has been thrown into turmoil by revelations that he helped his girlfriend get a high-paying job.

  • Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass. and chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, told CNBC’s “Squawk Box” that a bill requiring companies to hold advisory votes on executive pay is a “moderate” piece of legislation and would cause no harm.

  • Back on April 2, the Supreme Court handed down a decision that is the basis for Cramer’s weeklong “Green Day” series, in which the Court effectively made it profitable to start investing in companies that help cut back on pollution and clean up the environment. Today he's talking water.Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • The big week in Internet earnings reaches a crescendo this afternoon when Google reports earnings. These numbers come at a fascinating time in the company's history.Google has become a kind of financial underdog, compared to other big names in the sector, including Yahoo, which is still licking its wounds, and eBay, which is enjoying its second beat-and-raise quarter in a row. A strange position to be in for a company trading at nearly $500 a share.

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    If you went to bed and woke up this morning thinking the world was quiet and that today was going to be a light day at the office, you may want to call in, instead of relying on your BlackBerry. Research in Motion confirms a massive, system wide blackout affecting all its 8 million subscribers that began around 8 p.m. ET Tuesday, and while service is being restored, it is still sporadic and may take much of the day to get back on line completely.

  • Cramer is finally getting behind "green" companies - all because of a little Supreme Court decision handed down two weeks ago. Investing can be confusing. Luckily, Cramer has mapped out some road rules for all you Home Gamers trying to navigate the jungle that is Wall Street. Think of it as "Mad Money 101" –- some fundamental advice to keep in mind as you play the market. Whether you're a first time investor or a seasoned financier, it's always good to remember the basics.

  • Double Click

    Google's acquisition of DoubleClick wasn't much of a surprise since blogs and news coverage over the past few weeks have indicated that the company was in play and had several suitors, including Microsoft, Google, Yahoo and various others.But the big surprise happened over the weekend when we found out that Microsoft was building a coalition of companies to come out against the deal, and that the anti-trust poster-company was now playing the part of victim. Needless to say, this pot-calling-the-kettle-black legal strategy is raising some eyebrows.

  • Britain's Tate & Lyle said on Tuesday it had filed a case in the United States against three Chinese firms alleging infringement of its patents covering the manufacture of zero-calorie sweetener sucralose.

  • Virgin Media will argue rival BSkyB has abused a dominant position when their cable versus satellite row over Sky channels reaches court but competition lawyers believe it will be difficult to prove.

  • RadioShack was sued on Monday by the Texas Attorney General's office, which charged that the electronics retailer exposed consumers to potential identity theft by dumping data such as addresses and credit-card numbers in a trash bin behind one of its stores.

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    The European Commission confirmed Tuesday it had opened an antitrust probe into the way Apple's iTunes sells music online in coordination with major music companies.

  • The European Commission said Wednesday it was taking Spain to the EU's Court of Justice over the "unlawful" conditions Madrid put on E.On's multibillion euro bid to buy Spain's biggest electricity company, Endesa.

  • The U.S. House of Representatives on Friday voted to impose a Sept. 1, 2008, deadline for withdrawing all American combat troops from Iraq, prompting a quick veto promise from President George W. Bush.

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    New Jersey is the latest state where some legislators would like to ban text messaging while driving, sending a message to BlackBerry addicts who may have found a way to stay productive while sidelined by a traffic jam.

  • The chief executive of oil company Total was held for a second day of questioning Thursday in an investigation into the group's activities in Iran, while two other executives were released with no charges filed, the company said.

  • Former dot-com mogul Takafumi Horie was found guilty of securities laws violations and sentenced to two-and-a-half years in prison on Friday, in a case that has come to symbolize the challenges Japan faces in policing rising startups.

  • Two former managers of German industrial group Siemens denied charges of breach of trust and bribery but acknowledged making payments to employees of Italy's Enel to secure gas-turbines contracts.