Business Libya

More

  • Young Indian Muslims pose with placards during a protest rally against the ongoing political turmoil in Bahrain, Libya, and Yemen.

    Bahrainis and expats living in the Kingdom of Bahrain have been living history over the past month as the events in Tunisia and Egypt inspired the mostly Shia majority in Bahrain to take the streets demanding political, economic and social reform.

  • BENGHAZI, LIBYA - FEBRUARY 25: Libyans protest demanding the removal of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi following Friday prayers on February 25, 2011 in Benghazi, Libya. Benghazi residents mourned more victims of the violence as fighting continued around the capitol Tripoli.

    Middle East governments moving away from dictatorship must deliver quick wins through job creation to meet immediate hopes of street protesters but longer-term reforms need to ensure a more inclusive society, the head of the World Bank said on Wednesday.

  • Qatar's Foreign Policy

    Sharing his thoughts on the situation in Libya and the work his country is doing in infrastructure,with Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Bin Jabr al-Thani, Qatar prime minister and CNBC's Maria Bartiromo.

  • Qatari Prime Minister Sheikh Hamad

    Qatar hosts its first Business & Investment Forum in New York. The country is planning to invest over $35 billion outside of Qatar this year. Sheikh Hamad bin Jassim bin Jabr Al-Thani, Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Qatar sat down with Maria Bartiromo in a CNBC Exclusive.

  • Saudi youth wave their national flag as they celebrate the return of King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz in the Saudi capital Riyadh.

    Saudi Arabian policymakers will keep a careful eye on inflation in the coming months, following two massive infusions of stimulus money that they hope will support the Arab world's largest economy without driving domestic prices much higher.

  • Oil Refinery

    Oil prices have recovered from a short sharp sell-off late last month to hit fresh highs but could be about to sell off again, according to Julian Jessop, the chief international economist at Capital Economics.

  • A rebel militiaman stands guard at a Libyan oil refinery in rebel-held territory on February 27, 2011 in Al Brega, Libya. The opposition leadership has stressed that oil faciities in areas under its control are safe, despite the conflict roiling the country.

    Libyan rebels are set for their first oil export as soon as Tuesday as they seek funding to sustain their uprising against Muammer Gaddafi's 41-year rule of the north African nation, the Financial Times reports.

  • Libyan rebels gather on the frontline as smoke from a burning oil facility darkens the sky in Ras Lanuf, Libya.

    A Libyan government envoy has begun a trip to Europe to discuss an end to fighting, but gave no sign of any major climb down in a war that has ground to a stalemate between rebels and forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi.

  • Interest rates

    It is all but certain that the ECB will raise rates this week. It has been itching to do so for some time. Now that the moment has arrived, what will the move actually mean for the euro zone and the global economy?

  • CNBC.com Market Outlook

    A look at the week's top stock picks and business news, including David Sokol's surprise resignation from Berkshire Hathaway, with CNBC's Mandy Drury.

  • bull_bear_chart_200.jpg

    What a start to the year. Revolution across North Africa and war in Libya, $100 oil, renewed crisis in the euro zone and an environmental and nuclear disaster in Japan all tested investors' nerves in the first quarter of 2011; but despite this wall of worry, the Dow finished the quarter up over 6 percent.

  • These plays might be "glaringly obvious," but Cramer said they're making investors a lot of money.

  • General unrest in the Middle East has had a "dramatic impact on oil prices," the chief executive of a major South African mining and energy company said Thursday—and he makes no secret of the fact that that's good news for his firm.

  • The "Mad Money" host said the market likes what it sees.

  • A Lybian rebel stands on March 22, 2011 as rebel forces massed for a second day on several kilometres from the key city of Ajdabiya to try to attack government forces that have encircled the town.

    A week or so before Obama launched the attack on Libya, we warned that while an air-campaign could likely ground Gadaffi’s air force—hopes that it would accomplish much more were unfounded.

  • Middle East Turmoil

    The President delivered an excellent speech Monday night on the situation in Libya. He covered the reasons, thoughts, negotiations with allies etc. that explained very well why he took the action he did. You actually didn't need to watch the speech. You don't even have to read the transcript today. All you have to do is look at where the story is positioned in the papers to see how good it was.

  • President of the Italian Republic Giorgio Napolitano

    Italy's president, Giorgio Napolitano, told CNBC the euro zone's third-largest economy was in no danger of going the way of Portugal and Ireland and seek a financial bailout.

  • Here's what you should be watching Thursday, March 30.

  • Moammer Gaddafi speaking

    After missteps addressing Congressional concerns, President Obama has articulated clearly the goals, means and duration of the U.S. military action in Libya. Critics may say he did not address those issues, but he did and the answers are not acceptable.

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama told Americans on Monday the United States would work with its allies to hasten the day when Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi leaves power, but would not use force to topple him.