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  • Report: Clinic Supplies Drugs to Sports' Biggest Names

    According to a recent report, some of the best players in baseball may still be using performance-enhancing drugs, reports CNBC's Brian Shactman.

  • Koufax Returns to LA Dodgers as Adviser

    CNBC's Jane Wells reports Hall-of-Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax is going to return to the Los Angeles Dodgers as a special adviser.

  • The 2013 Hall of Fame Shut Out

    CNBC's Brian Shactman reports no player was elected into the Major League Baseball's Hall of Fame; and Tom Verducci, Sports Illustrated senior writer and MLB Network baseball insider.

  • No Players Elected to Baseball Hall of Fame

    Craig Biggio topped 37 candidates with 68.2 percent of "Hall of Fame" ballots, reports CNBC's Brian Shactman.

  • Baseball's Fiscal Myth

    CNBC's Brian Shactman reports on whether the looming "fiscal cliff" will impact the salaries and bonuses of major league baseball players.

  • The Baseball Cliff

    Professional baseball players and major league owners are in a fever pitch to finalize contract negotiations by years end, with CNBC's Brian Shactman.

  • baseball on money gettyp

    The "fiscal cliff" can take millions away from Major League baseball players.

  • 100% of Major League Baseball in the 1%

    CNBC's Brian Shactman takes a look at what the fiscal cliff means for baseball.

  • Groupon To Be MLB's Official Daily Deals Site

    Groupon announced it's becoming Major League Baseball's official daily deals website, reports CNBC's Julia Boorstin.

  • No Crying Over Taxes in Baseball's Winter Meetings

    An analysis by agent Scott Boras's office shows that a $10 million-a-year player traded from Florida to the Toronto Blue Jays could face a tax hike of $800,000.

  • Joe Torre on Fighting Domestic Abuse

    Former Yankee manager Joe Torre, co-founder of Joe Torre Safe At Home Foundation, discusses the Major League Baseball playoffs, and his journey to fighting domestic abuse.

  • Baseball Money

    With the announcement of an 8-year deal with Fox and TBS — combined with a recent deal with ESPN (owned by Walt Disney) — MLB basically will double its television revenue. Fox, whose parent company is Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, will pay more than $500 million a year.

  • ESPN's $5.6 Billion TV Deal: Sources

    According to sources, ESPN will be paying $700 million for the next 8 years for the right to broadcast Major League Baseball, with CNBC's Seema Mody.

  • tickets_money_200.jpg

    Sports ticketing has always been under pricing and availability pressures—and  subject to the wrath of fans. But a fairly new way of doing business is being tested by sports leagues, hoping to boost revenues and fan access.

  • Dodger Stadium

    Ticket sales are up 13 percent, averaging 41,000 a game. That puts the Dodgers in sixth place in MLB ticket sales.

  • Old Baseball Cards circa 1909-1911

    Karl Kissner picked up a soot-covered cardboard box that had been under a wooden dollhouse in his grandfather's attic. Taking a look inside, he saw baseball cards bundled with twine. They were smaller than the ones he was used to seeing.

  • Boulevard-brewing-Grill-200.jpg

    As the beer giants consolidated, there was an opening for craft brewer Boulevard Brewing to take a chance on splurging on a sponsorship at Kansas City's Kauffman stadium. The risk not only paid off, it's a homerun.

  • louisiville-slugger-wood-200.jpg

    The Louisville Slugger was trademarked in 1894, but its contribution to the history of sports marketing might be as significant as the product itself.

  • National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY.

    Players played in the steroid era, we watched it. It was, in the end, good for baseball. And to accept it is good for Cooperstown too.

  • Former all-star baseball pitcher Roger Clemens (C) and his attorney Rusty Hardin (R) arrive at the U.S. District Court after the jury announced it has a verdict in Clemens' perjury and obstruction trial June 18, 2012 in Washington, DC. The jury found Clemens not guilty on all counts.

    Roger Clemens has been acquitted on all charges by a jury that decided he didn't lie to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs.