Sports Business Major League Baseball

  • No Crying Over Taxes in Baseball's Winter Meetings

    An analysis by agent Scott Boras's office shows that a $10 million-a-year player traded from Florida to the Toronto Blue Jays could face a tax hike of $800,000.

  • Joe Torre on Fighting Domestic Abuse

    Former Yankee manager Joe Torre, co-founder of Joe Torre Safe At Home Foundation, discusses the Major League Baseball playoffs, and his journey to fighting domestic abuse.

  • Baseball Money

    With the announcement of an 8-year deal with Fox and TBS — combined with a recent deal with ESPN (owned by Walt Disney) — MLB basically will double its television revenue. Fox, whose parent company is Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, will pay more than $500 million a year.

  • ESPN's $5.6 Billion TV Deal: Sources

    According to sources, ESPN will be paying $700 million for the next 8 years for the right to broadcast Major League Baseball, with CNBC's Seema Mody.

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    Sports ticketing has always been under pricing and availability pressures—and  subject to the wrath of fans. But a fairly new way of doing business is being tested by sports leagues, hoping to boost revenues and fan access.

  • Dodger Stadium

    Ticket sales are up 13 percent, averaging 41,000 a game. That puts the Dodgers in sixth place in MLB ticket sales.

  • Old Baseball Cards circa 1909-1911

    Karl Kissner picked up a soot-covered cardboard box that had been under a wooden dollhouse in his grandfather's attic. Taking a look inside, he saw baseball cards bundled with twine. They were smaller than the ones he was used to seeing.

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    As the beer giants consolidated, there was an opening for craft brewer Boulevard Brewing to take a chance on splurging on a sponsorship at Kansas City's Kauffman stadium. The risk not only paid off, it's a homerun.

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    The Louisville Slugger was trademarked in 1894, but its contribution to the history of sports marketing might be as significant as the product itself.

  • National Baseball Hall of Fame, Cooperstown, NY.

    Players played in the steroid era, we watched it. It was, in the end, good for baseball. And to accept it is good for Cooperstown too.

  • Former all-star baseball pitcher Roger Clemens (C) and his attorney Rusty Hardin (R) arrive at the U.S. District Court after the jury announced it has a verdict in Clemens' perjury and obstruction trial June 18, 2012 in Washington, DC. The jury found Clemens not guilty on all counts.

    Roger Clemens has been acquitted on all charges by a jury that decided he didn't lie to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs.

  • Fast Money Portfolio: Chicago Cubs Owner on Bonds

    Chicago Cubs owner and chairman of Incapital Tom Ricketts, shares his opinions on how investors can organize their portfolios in a low-rate economy.

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    Since 2006, I have been telling you who is going to win the title. Since that time, I have had the champion on my list all six times.

  • The stereotype about professional athletes’ wives is they’re not much more than gold-digging arm candy, with few accomplishments of their own. The stereotype no longer applies today, thanks to the efforts of some high-profile women who established themselves well before they married their famous husbands.Many of the wives of today’s professional athletes are entrepreneurs and business professionals. Some of them have been so successful in their chosen fields they are as famous as their husbands.

    What follows is a list of the wives of 10 athletes who’ve made names for themselves as columnists, models, designers and more.

  • PHOENIX, AZ - SEPTEMBER 10: Curt Schilling, former member of the 2001 Arizona Diamondbacks World Series team walks in the dugout before the Major League Baseball game against the San Diego Padres at Chase Field on September 10, 2011 in Phoenix, Arizona. The Diamondbacks are celebrating the 10th anniversary of their World Series title.

    Former major league pitcher Curt Schilling has laid off the entire staff that formed his videogame company, 38 Studios, just months after the company designed its first game.

  • In 1968, pop artist Andy Warhol said: "In the future, everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes." Unlike most of his art, the saying found a foothold in pop culture, and to this day it’s commonly used to describe the here-today-gone-tomorrow status of many celebrities.Like reality show stars and pop singers, professional athletes are celebrities, too, and for every Michael Jordan who parlays his athletic stardom into successful business ventures, there are dozens of others who burst into the

    For every Michael Jordan, there are dozens who have just a brief moment in the sun. Read ahead to see athletes who faded away after their 15 minutes of fame.

  • Josh Hamilton

    Texas Rangers outfielder Josh Hamilton is having an incredible season, leading the American League in average, home runs and RBI. Despite Hamilton’s tear, which included a four home run game on May 8, collectors aren’t exactly fighting for the centerfielder’s memorabilia.

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    The hottest NFL rookie endorser, Robert Griffin III, has scored yet another sponsorship deal

  • Big XII Conference

    The University of Missouri said it could earn as much as $12 million more per year from an new TV deal in the Southeastern Conference, compared to the deal it had in the Big 12.

  • Home Plate Farm

    The suburban Boston home where Babe Ruth lived after he had been sent to the New York Yankees is for sale, and the asking price is more than Ruth made in his entire playing career.