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    A Chinese scientific research center has built the fastest supercomputer ever made, replacing the United States as maker of the swiftest machine, and giving China bragging rights as a technology superpower. The New York Times reports.

  • Mumbai, India

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  • Kobe, Japan

    Like many members of Japan’s middle class, Masato Y. enjoyed a level of affluence two decades ago that was the envy of the world. Masato, a small-business owner, bought a $500,000 condominium, vacationed in Hawaii and drove a late-model Mercedes.

  • Malaysia's economy is poised for robust growth this year with the nation's gross domestic product set to rise at least 6 percent, the country's prime minister Najib Razak told CNBC.

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    South Korea, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and others in Southeast and East Asia are benefiting from an export-driven regional boom and the lessons of a financial crisis a decade ago.

  • Chinese miner

    China is planning to tighten its control over its rare earth minerals by allowing just a handful of state companies to oversee the mining of the scarce elements, which are vital to some of the world’s greenest technologies. The NYT reports.

  • 2010 will be a better year than 2009 but competitive challenges remain, observed Azmil Zahruddin, CEO and managing director of Malaysia Airlines.

  • The market won't retest its March lows, but it will turn choppy around January or February, said Joe Quinlan, chief market strategist at Bank of America.

  • Maxis, Malaysia's biggest telecom firm plans to list on the stock market by mid-November, media reports said.

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    Many market experts and economists are saying that the world has avoided the next Great Depression, but concerns still abound about how long negative or slow economic growth will continue.

  • As the buzz about economic recovery grows louder, a new survey reveals the best place in the world to ride out the rest of the recession, which could be one of the first stops on the recovery train.

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    Najib Razak was sworn in as Malaysia's sixth prime minister on Friday, taking the reins of an economy grappling with a sharp slowdown and a growing racial and religious divide.

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    Incoming Malaysian premier Najib Razak looks set to initiate aggressive political and economic reforms, but change could be slow and difficult as the country faces one of its toughest tests.

  • Sydney and Tokyo led Asian bourses higher in what was a mixed day for the region marked by thin trade as investors stayed on the sidelines in the wake of the U.S. Thanksgiving Day holiday.

  • Asian market rose for a fifth day Thursday, helped by hopes that policymakers' efforts will ultimately prevail after a surprise and aggressive rate cut from China, though U.S. data ominously reflected a deep recession.

  • Stocks in Japan and Australia fell Wednesday after a report showed the U.S. economy shrank by the most since 2001, underscoring sharply slowing global demand, while South Korean shares were boosted by steelmakers after BHP Billiton killed its bid for Rio Tinto.

  • Asian markets rose Tuesday and so-called safe haven assets such as bonds fell after the U.S. government rescued banking giant Citigroup to prevent further damage to the ailing global financial system.

  • Asian markets were mostly lower Monday, with bank stocks leading the drop, and so-called safe-haven assets like the yen gained as investors digested the latest news on U.S. measures to prop up Citigroup.

  • Asian markets experienced a large turnaround Friday, after hitting five-year lows in the morning session. Stocks bounced into the black on rumors that China would adjust interest rates as well as short covering.

  • Asian markets further weakened Wednesday while the yen rose, with risk-averse investors fretting about the deepening damage to corporate profits and consumer spending despite a late rally on Wall Street.