Asia Top News and Analysis Malaysia

  • Asian stocks rose on Wednesday as global markets halted recent losing streaks and posted modest gains on the back of solid earnings reports and positive broker comments, while investors await the outcome of debt issuance in the euro zone.

  • Asian stock markets ended mixed on Tuesday as government debt burdens in Europe weighed on investor sentiment.

  • Asian stocks mostly traded to the downside on Monday, after a lackluster U.S. job report drove Wall Street lower Friday, but trading volume was light with Japan markets closed for a public holiday.

  • Asian markets ended mixed on Friday as investors stayed cautious ahead of the U.S. nonfarm payrolls report.

  • Japanese shares rallied on Thursday as investors snapped up shares of Japanese exporters after the dollar hit two-week highs against the yen, but markets elsewhere in Asia were more subdued ahead of the influential U.S. non-farm payrolls report. 

  • Asian markets closed mixed on Wednesday following a broad commodities selloff but losses were limited as stronger-than expected U.S. factory data lent support.

  • Japanese stocks led Asian equities higher on Tuesday, climbing to their highest since May, with investors betting the improving U.S. recovery may be reflected in jobs data later in the week.

  • South Korean shares stole the limelight on the first trading day of 2011 as the KOSPI rose nearly 1 percent to end at a record closing high. But volume was thin overall with many major markets closed for a public holiday.

  • Commune group brought to bow to Great Leader on Grand Monument, Pyongyang, North Korea, Asia

    North Korea showed a visiting American nuclear scientist earlier this month a vast new facility it secretly and rapidly built to enrich uranium, confronting the Obama administration with the prospect that the country is preparing to expand its nuclear arsenal or build a far more powerful type of atomic bomb, the New York Times reports.

  • Japanese Flag

    American policy makers have long been confident, even during the darkest days of the current financial crisis, that the United States could avoid the fate of Japan and its two lost decades. But that has changed, reports the New York Times.

  • keyboard_control_200.jpg

    A Chinese scientific research center has built the fastest supercomputer ever made, replacing the United States as maker of the swiftest machine, and giving China bragging rights as a technology superpower. The New York Times reports.

  • Mumbai, India

    abstract goes here

  • Kobe, Japan

    Like many members of Japan’s middle class, Masato Y. enjoyed a level of affluence two decades ago that was the envy of the world. Masato, a small-business owner, bought a $500,000 condominium, vacationed in Hawaii and drove a late-model Mercedes.

  • Malaysia's economy is poised for robust growth this year with the nation's gross domestic product set to rise at least 6 percent, the country's prime minister Najib Razak told CNBC.

  • seoul stock-resized.jpg

    South Korea, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia and others in Southeast and East Asia are benefiting from an export-driven regional boom and the lessons of a financial crisis a decade ago.

  • Chinese miner

    China is planning to tighten its control over its rare earth minerals by allowing just a handful of state companies to oversee the mining of the scarce elements, which are vital to some of the world’s greenest technologies. The NYT reports.

  • 2010 will be a better year than 2009 but competitive challenges remain, observed Azmil Zahruddin, CEO and managing director of Malaysia Airlines.

  • The market won't retest its March lows, but it will turn choppy around January or February, said Joe Quinlan, chief market strategist at Bank of America.

  • Maxis, Malaysia's biggest telecom firm plans to list on the stock market by mid-November, media reports said.

  • China Skyline.jpg

    Many market experts and economists are saying that the world has avoided the next Great Depression, but concerns still abound about how long negative or slow economic growth will continue.