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  • Asian markets declined 1% on average Thursday, weighed down by banking shares after Lehman Brothers failed to to restore investor confidence with plans to sell a majority stake in its asset management unit and spin off commercial real estate.

  • Asian stocks weakened Wednesday, hurt by financial shares ahead of results from Lehman Brothers, which has been rocked by the same crisis that led Washington to take over Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac this week.

  • Asian stocks fell Tuesday in a sobering realization the U.S. takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac has addressed some risks stemming from the financial crisis but has not solved it. Japan, South Korea and Australia all finished over 1 percent lower.

  • Asian markets surged Monday after Washington took over Fannie Mae and Freddie Macto save the U.S. housing market and limit the extensive damage of the financial crisis. Japan and Australia both gained 3.5%, with South Korea soaring 5%.

  • Fears about economic growth and a 3% slump on Wall Street sent Asian markets sprawling Friday, with investors sought safe-haven bonds and unwound currency carry trades, lifting the yen to a 13-month high versus the euro.

  • Asian shares fell to new two-year lows Thursday as further signs of a slowing global economy -- from the euro zone to Japan -- hit sectors, such as technology, that rely on exports.

  • Asian markets were mixed Wednesday as oil prices held below $110 and the U.S. dollar neared a 10-½ month high, raising hopes of an easier business environment for manufacturers and exporters, but rattling resource-focused stocks. 

  • Asian markets extended losses in late trade Tuesday with Japan finishing at a 5-month low in the wake of its prime minister's sudden resignation. A state of emergency declared by Thailand also weighed on regional stocks.

  • Asian markets were sharply lower Monday, stung by the technology sector, which is anticipating slower global demand. South Korea was the worst hit, sinking 4 percent.

  • Asia stocks rallied Friday, led by industrial companies and exporters, after a big upward revision to second quarter U.S. economic growth boosted the outlook for demand. Japan closed 2.4% higher, the market's bigger one-day percentage gain in three weeks.

  • Asian markets ended mixed Thursday in seesaw trading, following the Dow's firm close Wednesday on a rebound in financial stocks. Japan finished flat whilst South Korea fell over 1 percent and Australia climbed 1 percent.

  • Asian markets were flatish Wednesday, with stocks swinging in and out of negative territory. But exporter shares fell as the U.S. and euro zone economies sputtered though investors found some value in companies dependent on domestic growth.

  • Asian stocks were weak Tuesday, after more trouble in the U.S. financial sector, including a ninth bank failure, reminded investors of the frail state of the global economy. But both Japan and Australia finished off their session lows.

  • Asian markets rebounded Monday from a two-year low as the drop in oil prices lifted exporter shares. Both Japan and Australia finished over 1% higher.

  • Asian stocks slipped to a two-year low Friday, falling for a fourth straight week, as a surge in oil prices to above $121 knocked the U.S. dollar and the spiraling financial crisis showed no signs of ending.

  • Asian markets fell Thursday on gloom about the ability of exporters to weather a widespread economic slowdown, while the U.S. dollar slipped as oil prices rose to above $116 a barrel and halted a rally in the currency.

  • Most Asian markets edged higher Wednesday, rebounding from a two-year low as Chinese shares surged on hopes for policies from Beijing to jumpstart growth, though many analysts say this is a long shot.

  • Asian markets fell to a two-year low Tuesday, led by exporter shares, on fears the U.S. government will have to bail out the top mortgage finance companies, further destabilizing the financial sector.

  • Asian markets were mostly softer Monday, with Chinese stocks sliding over 5 percent. But the weaker yen helped Japan close over 1% higher, with exporters supporting that market.

  • Asian markets were mixed Friday as investors struggled to factor in, what extent potential recessions in Britain, Europe and Japan would have on corporate Asia's bottom line.