×

Tech Mark Zuckerberg

  • Scott Wapner gets iced after accepting the Ice Bucket Challenge!

    CNBC anchors, corporate leaders and even New Jersey Governor Chris Christie participated in the ice bucket challenge to raise awareness for ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease. The ALS Association reports receiving $9.5 million from July 29th to August 15th of this year.

  • Sandberg takes the ice bucket challenge

    Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and Philadelphia Phillies shortstop Jimmy Rollins completed the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge today.

  • Governor Chris Christie

    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie posted on his Facebook page a video showing two of his kids dumping a bucket of ice water on his head.

  • Costolo accepts CNBC's ice bucket challenge

    CNBC's Scott Wapner accepted the "ice bucket challenge" on "Fast Money Halftime Report." Wapner passed it on to Mark Zuckerberg and Dick Costolo.

  • CNBC's Wapner accepts ice bucket challenge

    CNBC's Scott Wapner accepts the "ice bucket challenge" from Biogen Idec's Doug Williams on "Fast Money Halftime Report." He then passes it to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and Twitter CEO Dick Costolo. Trader Pete Najarian shares the story of his brother Paul who passed from ALS.

  • Mark Zuckerberg joins exclusive club

    CNBC's Robert Frank reports Mark Zuckerberg is now richer than the Google guys and Amazon's Jeff Bezos.

  • Facebook's record close on Thursday, fueled by earnings, added $1.6 billion to CEO Mark Zuckerberg's bottom line. USA Today reports.

  • Facebook innovating one product... Facebook: Blodget

    Henry Blodget, Business Insider editor-in-chief & CEO, discusses Facebook's "staggering" quarterly earnings and the social networks innovation. CNBC's Jon Fortt provides perspective.

  • Cramer: Facebook a machine

    The "Squawk on the Street" news team breaks down Facebook's better-than-expected second quarter results. CNBC's Jim Cramer says Facebook told an amazing earnings story.

  • The Facebook  logo is displayed on an Apple iPad Air in this photo in Washington.

    Facebook reported earnings and revenue that beat estimates in the second quarter, thanks to its robust mobile ad business.

  • Facebook

    Ben Lerer, Thrillist Media Group co-founder & CEO, explains why he is a big believer of Facebook and says it's the best source of users for his company.

  • The Facebook “Like” and the WhatsApp logos are displayed in this photo.

    Facebook's reliance on traditional Web advertising is a thing of the past. Two years removed from its controversial initial public offering, the social network has rapidly become the second-biggest recipient of mobile ad dollars, behind Google. Those tiny smartphone promotions now account for over half of sales.

  • Google Glass

    Google Glass is partnering with technology start-ups, which may help it carve out a more important and profitable role in business.

  • McNamee: Facebook experiment mistake

    The "Squawk Alley" team and Roger McNamee, Elevation Partners co-founder, discuss the psychological experiment conducted by Facebook where data scientists manipulated content in feeds to gauge users' emotional response. McNamee says this is not a Facebook specific problem; it's a problem of all free services on the web.

  • California's business success has come in spite of its hefty tax and regulatory burden.

  • Most stereotypes associated with the world's ultra-high-net-worth UHNW)population are just plain wrong, says research house Wealth X Institute.

  • Cash dollars

    IPOs and the mass of acquisitions in tech are producing a newly rich class; money managers fight to handle the wealth.

  • David Marcus, president of PayPal Inc.

    David Marcus, who has led eBay's PayPal unit for the past two years, will join Facebook, the companies announced on Monday.

  • Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

    A Facebook investor is suing the corporation and its founder, Mark Zuckerberg, over its director compensation plan.

  • Facebook gets sued

    CNBC's Jon Fortt reports Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg are being accused of wasting corporate assets.