Technology Mark Zuckerberg

  • Your newsfeed may soon have TV-style advertisements. Facebook plans to sell 15-second spots to marketers in an effort to dip into the gold mine of money made by TV networks ad deals.

  • Pro sees 'massive' opportunity for Facebook

    Facebook stock has a long way to climb due to a few factors, Colin Sebastian of R.W. Baird says.

  • Facebook on fire

    Growing revenue from mobile ads is helping facebook shares. Aeisha Mastagni, CalSTRS, and Arvind Bhatia, Sterne Agee, discuss the next move for Facebook investors.

  • Mark Zuckerberg may have dispelled his investor's fears about Facebook being less used among teens in his prepared words for the quarterly release. Shares rose sharply at %17.

  • What to Expect From Facebook

    Mark Mahaney, RBC Capital Markets analyst, discusses why it's important Facebook shows it can generate "meaningful revenue."

  • Mark Zuckerberg Ditches Hoodie For Suit in Seoul

    Facebook founder and billionaire Mark Zuckerberg ditched his trademark hoodie as he arrived in Seoul to meet with South Korean President Park Geun-hye and Samsung Electronics officials to discuss ways to enhance business cooperation.

  • "Squawk Box" hit the road this week from the HP tech conference in Vegas to the US Open -- with a whole lot of, um, Squawkward moments in between!

  • Facebook Missing Out on the Social Media Rally

    The social media sector is getting a big boost this year. What are companies like Annie's and Yelp doing right that Facebook seems to be doing wrong? Anthony DiClemente, Barclays, and CNBC's Julia Boorstin discuss.

  • One father bet his son's college savings on the stock, with Patricia Powell, Powell Financial Group, and Ric Edelman, Edelman Financial Services.

  • Dimon's Double-Dare

    A banker in Germany fell asleep at his computer with this finger pressed on the number 2, causing the accidental transfer of millions of euros. Jamie Dimon is ready to fight back against anyone who wants to sue the bank over London Whale losses. CNBC's John Carney and Kayla Tausche, discuss.

  • Why This Facebook Bear Turned Bull

    A bull and bear play on Lululemon's leadership change, with Fast Money traders, Josh Brown and Mike Murphy. And, Paul Meeks, Saturna Capital, explains why he changed his mind on the tech giant since going public last year.

  • Shareholder to Facebook ... Grow Up!

    Aeisha Mastagni, CalSTRS investment officer, shares her views on what Facebook is doing right and where it can improve, as the company comes face-to-face with some unhappy shareholders.

  • Russia's leading online social network was briefly banned on Friday, in a move dismissed as a "mistake" but which follows intensifying official pressure on the company.

  • A new study shows teens are flocking to Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr, and SnapChat because too many adults are using Facebook, reports CNBC's Becky Quick.

  • What's Zuckerberg Worth?

    The CEO of Facebook has seen his personal wealth fluctuate between a high of $19.14 billion to a low of $8.92 billion over the past year, reports CNBC's Robert Frank.

  • Who Are Facebook's Emerging Leaders?

    In the past few months several new names have come into the spotlight, reports CNBC's Julia Boorstin. And, William Hambrecht, WR Hambrecht + co-founder & CEO, shares his thoughts on the stock's status.

  • The Many Faces Behind Facebook

    Henry Blodget, Business Insider CEO & editor-in-chief; and Steve Bertoni, Forbes associate editor, discuss how the social networking company has grown up in the past twelve months.

  • Is Zuckerberg In Over His Hoodie?

    It's been nearly one year since Facebook went public. In that time, Facebook stock is down nearly 30 percent. Ben Parr, CNET, and Chris Dessi, Silverback Social CEO, weigh in.

  • What's Next For Apple and Facebook?

    Kevin Landis, FirstHand Funds, takes a look at what's in the pipeline for Apple and Facebook; and the next big innovations in tech.

  • Why Cramer Likes Facebook

    Facebook wants to invest every penny in its business, explains Mad Money host Jim Cramer. Just because it doesn't pay bountiful dividends, and return cash with legitimate buybacks doesn't mean it's bad.