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  • The jobs number may have sent many market bulls running for the exits Friday morning, but not Brian Kelly of Kanundrum Capital. So why the optimism?

  • Coal Plant

    Even as developed countries close or limit the construction of coal-fired power plants out of concern over pollution and climate-warming emissions, coal has found a rapidly expanding market elsewhere: Asia, particularly China. The NYT reports.

  • Papua New Guinea Warrior Holding Axe

    An expected flood of money in Papua New Guinea could throw a country already beset by corruption into further turmoil. The NYT reports.

  • chinese_trawler_protest_200.jpg

    Escalating a dispute over Japan’s detention of a Chinese fishing trawler captain, China placed a trade embargo on all exports to Japan of some crucial rare earth elements. The New York Times reports.

  • Ever wonder how a company makes the 52-week high list? This is how.

  • The analyst who gave The Men's Warehouse an upgrade explains what he sees in the corporate apparel retailer.

  • If your American bank bet isn't working out, Veracruz founder Steve Cortes recommends going "north of the border."

  • Chiquicamata Coppermine, Atacama Desert, Chile

    A fresh law, buried in the Wall Street reforms passed last month, will force many manufacturers to identify any  "conflict minerals" that can be traced back to the Democratic Republic of the Congo or adjoining countries. The FT reports.

  • Here's what analysts and others say they're watching before the bell Tuesday.

  • Here's what analysts and others say they're watching before the bell Monday.

  • Here's what analysts and others say they're watching before the bell Friday.

  • over_population_200.jpg

    In 2050, we expect the world population to reach 9 billion people. If we continue on the same path as we are today, those 9 billion people will require the resources of 2.3 planets in order to survive. While humankind has achieved many amazing technological innovations throughout time, creating two more Earths is likely out of the question.

  • French policemen carry away a Greenpeace activist during a protest in front of the right-wing ruling UMP party headquarters in Paris on March 31, 2008. Greenpeace members demonstrated by dropping nine tons of corn 'not genetically modified' in front of the building a day ahead of the debate at the National Assembly on the bill on GMO.

    After decades of pushing nations to surrender more power to the European Union, the bloc is pulling back on efforts to assert its authority over one highly contentious issue, genetically modified foods. The New York Times reports.

  • The Shanghai Composite, often a leading indicator in global markets' direction, is due for a consolidation, followed by a rebound, Daryl Guppy, CEO of Guppytraders.com, told CNBC on Thursday.

  • The year-long trend upwards in the stock market is over and commodities are also set to correct, according to Robin Griffiths, technical analyst at Cazenove Capital. As a result, Griffiths suggested investors look for risk-averse trades.

  • There is money to be made in Asia as it is a more attractive investment destination than Western markets, said Julian Galvin, associate director at Tyche.

  • The growth in the emerging markets is starting to harm advanced economies, Frederic Neumann, MD & co-head of Asian economics research at HSBC, told CNBC on Thursday.

  • Farmer picking weeds

    For 15 years, Eddie Anderson, a farmer, has been a strict adherent of no-till agriculture, an environmentally friendly technique that all but eliminates plowing to curb erosion and the harmful runoff of fertilizers and pesticides. The NYT reports.

  • Global stocks were lower on Tuesday, moving away from 18-1/2 month highs. As the Dow closed above 11,000 on Monday, experts told CNBC that they are bullish on stocks, especially U.S. stocks.

  • The Standard & Poor's 500 index will top out on April 19, which will trigger a 15 to 20 percent pullback in other stock markets, but stocks will move higher later in the year Robin Griffiths, technical strategist at Cazenove Capital said Monday.

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