Global Markets 2011 - Special Report

Matt Nesto

Matt Nesto, CNBC Rep_25639852
Correspondent, CNBC

Matt Nesto joined CNBC in August 2007 as a general assignment reporter for the network’s Business Day programming.

Prior to joining CNBC, Nesto spent nine years at Bloomberg Television where he most recently served as anchor of its "Morning Call" program. Nesto was also an anchor and stocks editor for "Bloomberg’s Market Week" based in New York.

Previously, Nesto was a European correspondent for Bloomberg Television based in London and was also an anchor, producer and news director for Bloomberg Television in Tokyo, Malaysia and Singapore. While in Asia, Nesto created and launched "Bloomberg Malaysia," an unprecedented joint-venture program in Kuala Lumpur, which earned him a nomination for "Best Newscast in Asia" at the Asian TV Awards in 2000.

Before joining Bloomberg Television, Nesto held financial consultant and investment advisor positions at Lehman Brothers, Prudential Securities and Merrill Lynch.

Nesto began his broadcasting career as a general assignment reporter for WPTZ-TV in Burlington, VT/Plattsburgh, NY as well as Bureau Chief and general assignment reporter for WMUR-TV in Manchester, NH.

Nesto earned a Bachelor’s degree in mass communications and broadcast journalism from Emerson College in Boston, MA.

More

  • Nearly 200 companies have reported earnings overnight and Thursday. Within that pack, it seems there's a disproportionate number of non-U.S. companies. In fact, by my calculations, there are 19 stocks from 11 different countries in my personal daily news mix...

  • Consumer discretionary stocks are not only the worst performers today — and this week and this month — but 60 percent of the 18 discretionary stocks that reported earnings are down. So what is working in one of the worst groups right now?

  • Energy stocks are not only the worst performing sector today, but they also hold the 1st or 2nd spot on the loser list for the week, the month and since September 1st.

  • This market is now a bear-within-a-bear: The S&P 500 have given up 20 percent since Sept. 1, 2008. About 30 S&P stocks are down by 50 percent or more. See the stats — and the biggest losers.

  • So it's the bottom of the 9th with six outs and the SEC has finally moved to clarify the mandate that has needlessly rendered great firms worthless and brought the global financial markets to their knees. WHAT TOOK YOU SO LONG?!!

  • "A mediocre idea that generates enthusiasm will go further than a great idea that inspires no one." - Mary Kay

  • The Price is Right -- or is it? With untold billions about to be put to work to mop up this mortgage-related mess, the $700 billion question is price. How will "PBC Partners" (Paulson Bernanke Cox) figure out what to pay for all those ''priceless assets'' when for months, Wall Street's smartest were unable to get much further than "illiquid = worthless"?

  • As details of the government's belated "Federal Toxic Landfill Act" emerge -- that is, the rescue plan put forth by Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson -- many thoughts come to mind but none more often than how ticked-off the troops at the Thundering Herd must be...

  • (That's Balance Sheet, of course.) As Morgan Stanley, Genworth, State Street, WaMu and others are feeling the squeeze, I feel the need to dispel some myths that are crippling Wall St. and arguably the world.

  • The U.S. dollar dropped Wednesday against the euro and against the yen, after news that the Federal Reserve would bail out AIG. But CNBC's Matt Nesto reports that the Fed continuing to hold interest rates steady might make the greenback a good buy.