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  • LONDON, April 18- Thanks to scientists working under the auspices of the World Health Organization, you can be fairly sure your toothbrush won't give you cancer. Over four decades, a WHO research agency has assessed 989 substances and activities, ranging from arsenic to hairdressing, and found only one was "probably not" likely to cause cancer in humans.

  • GENEVA, April 15- The World Health Organization's expert group on immunisation said on Friday it recommended that countries consider introducing Sanofi's dengue vaccine Dengvaxia in areas where prevalence of the virus was 50 percent or higher. Vaccination should be done between the ages of nine and 14, but efficacy improved as people got older, Jon Abramson,...

  • April 15- The European health regulator said it extended a safety review of chronic hepatitis C treatments after new data showed patients taking the drugs were at risk of their liver cancer returning. "The study suggested that these patients were at risk of their cancer coming back earlier than patients with hepatitis C who were not treated with direct-acting...

  • GENEVA, April 15- The World Health Organization's expert group on immunisation said on Friday it recommended that countries consider introducing Sanofi's dengue vaccine Dengvaxia in areas where prevalence of the virus was 50 percent or higher. Vaccination should be done between the ages of nine and 11, but efficacy improved as people got older, Jon Abramson,...

  • Theranos under fire

    After the WSJ reported regulators are considering banning Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes from owning or running any labs for at least two years, Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, Yale School Management; Bill George, Harvard Business School; and Les Funtleyder, ESquared portfolio manager, discuss Theranos.

  • The fight against Zika

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell looks at the CDC's new study on the link between the virus and microcephaly, and the Gates Foundation's involvement in helping to control mosquito populations.

  • World Bank Pres. on Zika

    We are trying to build a pandemic response system, says World Bank President Jim Yong Kim talking to CNBC's Sara Eisen about global health concerns, how to contain the spread of Zika, and the downside risks associated with the virus.

  • Sean Parker speaking at the 2015 CGI Annual Meeting in New York.

    Following his announcement to donate $250 million for cancer research, Sean Parker joined CNBC to discuss his initiative.

  • U.S. and world health officials have been saying for some time that mounting scientific evidence points to the mosquito-born virus as the likely cause of the alarming rise in microcephaly in Zika-hit areas of Brazil. The announcement comes at a critical time for the Obama Administration, which has been trying to get Congress to come up with funding to fight the...

  • April 13- U.S. health officials have concluded that infection with the Zika virus in pregnant women is a cause of the birth defect microcephaly and other severe brain abnormalities in babies. "It is now clear, the CDC has concluded, that Zika virus does cause microcephaly," Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said in a...

  • CDC SAYS MICROCEPHALY LIKELY PART OF RANGE OF BIRTH DEFECTS CAUSED.

  • CDC SAYS CONCLUDES ZIKA VIRUS CAUSES MICROCEPHALY, OTHER BIRTH DEFECTS.

  • Fitbit to the rescue?

    Dr. Alfred Sacchetti, Chief of Emergency Medicine at Our Lady of Lourdes Medical Center, talks about how data from a patient's Fitbit helped guide ER doctors and save the man's life.

  • Start-up delivers on demand healthcare for pets

    Watch two brothers pitch their big idea in just 60-seconds to a panel of experts. Will their pet start-up be the next big thing?

  • *Panel recommends FDA wait for results of ongoing study. *Drug unlikely to get FDA approval- analyst. The panel voted 12-1 against giving the drug an accelerated approval, and recommended the FDA wait for the results from an ongoing late-stage trial that compares the drug's effect to that of chemotherapy.

  • Preventing further spreading of Zika

    Discussing the effects of the Zika virus on people, what needs to be done in order to prevent further spreading and research funding, with Nahid Bhadelia, Boston University of Infection Control & National Emerging Infectious Diseases Lab; and Timothy Flanigan, Brown University Chief of Infectious Diseases Division of the Medicine Department.

  • April 12- An independent panel of experts advising the U.S. Food and Drug Administration did not back the accelerated approval of Clovis Oncology Inc's lung cancer drug. The FDA is not obligated to follow the panel's recommendations, but it typically does so. On Friday, FDA scientists raised questions about whether rociletinib was superior to existing...

  • April 12- An independent panel of experts to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday asked Clovis Oncology Inc for more data on its lung cancer drug before making a final decision on the treatment. The drug, rociletinib, is designed to treat a subset of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer whose condition has worsened despite treatment.

  • WASHINGTON, April 11- AbbVie Inc won U.S. regulatory approval on Monday for a new drug to treat patients with a rare type of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, a blood cancer. The approval came well ahead of the FDA's late June action date for a decision. The FDA granted "breakthrough" designation to the drug last year, allowing it to be reviewed on a speedier schedule than...

  • A Facebook employee demonstrates use of the Oculus Gear VR virtual reality goggles at the Facebook Innovation Hub on February 24, 2016 in Berlin, Germany.

    A lot of focus has been placed on how virtual reality (VR) technology will transform the gaming industry, but it has many real-world uses.