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Biotech and Pharmaceuticals Medicine

  • On July 30, 2011, the Indianapolis Colts decided not to mess with success. They renewed the contract of star quarterback Peyton Manning who, in a fit of generosity, agreed to five more years of service for a mere . He didn’t need to be the highest paid player in the NFL, he said, and he would make do with the same $18 million a year that Tom Brady squeaked by on.It turned out to be a better deal than anyone realized. On Sept. 7, 2011, after problems recovering from neck surgery that he had under

    What are some of the most notable multimillion-dollar sports injuries? Check out the list.

  • Counterfeit prescription pharmaceuticals are widely recognized as a growing public health risk and a serious concern to public health officials, private companies, and consumers. This slideshow presents a shortened overview of the longer report,  In some countries around the world, counterfeit prescription drugs comprise as much as 70% of the drug supply and have been responsible for thousands of deaths in some of the world’s most impoverished nations, according to the World Health Organization

    Counterfeit prescription pharmaceuticals are widely recognized as a growing public health risk and a serious concern to public health officials, private companies, and consumers. Learn more.

  • A spokesman for the medical-technology industry warned that a new medical-device tax that goes into effect in 2013 under the Obama health-care law could force some companies to cut jobs.

  • Is America Still #1 in Medtech?

    Stephen Ubl, AdvaMed, and John Babitt, Ernst & Young head of Medtech for Americas, share insight on rising medical technology costs.

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    While new midlife parents may bring a special appreciation and years of wisdom to their postponed families, age-related hurdles can hit bank accounts and snag retirement and estate planning, requiring difficult decisions.

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    In the first overhaul of the system in 25 years, younger, healthier people will be given priority preference for kidneys over older, sicker people. This is a major change over the previous system which favored patients on a waiting list – first come, first served – irrespective of age or health condition.

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    Invention and innovation can change how an economy, a company, even the human body, works — quickly and profoundly. Our special report, "The Future of Innovation," is about defining innovation in the 21st century, and seeking out where it is alive and well in America.

  • Innovation has come at such a dizzying pace in recent decades that it has transformed our world in ways once only imagined in science fiction. As part of our "Future of Innovation" special report, we decided to take a look at some of the most influential innovations of the recent past. Compiling a definitive list turned out to be difficult, if not impossible — and almost certainly up for fierce debate. Nevertheless, we gave it a shot. Here is our list of the 15 of the most influential inventions

    Here is our list of the 15 of the most influential inventions over the past 50 years, created using a variety of studies as reference points, including ones from Knowledge@Wharton and Popular Mechanics.

  • A Healthy Sector?

    Discussing why healthcare is faring better than other sectors, with Larry Marsh, Barclay's Capital managing director.

  • Containing Healthcare Costs

    Cost containment continues to be the goal for the health care industry, with managed care companies potentially seeing a substantial upside from the initiative. Insight with, Charles Boorady, Credit Suisse managing director.

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    What if doctor's offices were like gym memberships? Pay a monthly fee and come as often as you like: no insurance, no deductible, no paperwork, no bill.  It's called direct primary health care and may be available in your state.

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    There's growing debate over whether America can afford Medicare as it is currently constructed and the costs sustainable.

  • Your Health, Your Dollars - A CNBC Special Report

    Critics of the Affordable Care Act say they are not seeing any change in costs and are worried that government-run health care will increase taxes and allow insurance companies to operate without rules.

  • Sphygmomanometer

    Many consumers assume that their health insurer, hospital, or state medical licensing agencies have vetted physicians who are open for business, but oversight is more lax than you might think.

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    What used to be mostly a matter of phony billing has spread to questionable medical procedures and identity theft, costing patients and insurers more than ever.

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    Though the U.S. had made much progress taking medical record keeping into the digital age, there's still some doubt that the government will reach its target by the prescribed deadline.

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    The reasons  Americans pay more than other industrialized countries for similar health care come down to how the system is run, starting with the bottom line.

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    Like many things in America these days, health care has been politicized. While the policy debate may strike many in Washington as all-important, for the majority of average Americans health care is primarily a matter of goods and services

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    With so many Americans working as consultants or freelancers because of the bad economy, more people are paying for their own coverage. Here's a guide to finding a provider.

  • Mylan's Bresch on Jobs

    Heather Bresch, Mylan CEO, discusses the difference between government and private sector jobs, and her company's current job situation.