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Biotech and Pharmaceuticals Medicine

  • Telemedicine on demand

    Hill Ferguson, Doctor on Demand CEO on lab results, telemedicine and health-care.

  • Opioid overdose, which claimed celebrities including Prince and Heath Ledger as victims, contributed to more than 33,000 deaths in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Earlier this month, the FDA asked Endo International Plc to withdraw its Opana ER painkiller from the market, the first time the agency has called for the removal...

  • The European Medicines Agency said on Friday its experts had backed the latest copy of the drug from South Korea's Samsung Bioepis, which specialises in making cheaper copies of complex biotech drugs known as biosimilars. Samsung Bioepis, an unlisted unit of South Korean conglomerate Samsung Group, already sells biosimilar copies of two other rheumatoid...

  • ZURICH, June 23- A European Medicines Agency panel recommended on Friday approving Novartis's Kisqali drug, bolstering the Swiss drugmaker's bid to challenge rival Pfizer's Ibrance against tough-to-treat breast cancer. The EMA's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use backed Kisqali in combination with hormone therapy as a first-line treatment...

  • The Roche Group's Rituxan, on the market for 20 years, is administered in a hospital or clinic through an intravenous drip that can take several hours. On Thursday, the Food and Drug Administration approved the Swiss drugmaker's new version, Rituxan Hycela. It's given every three weeks for six months to treat diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, for a total cost of about...

  • The Food and Drug Administration approved Rituxan Hycela to treat adults with follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Roche's Genentech unit said. The FDA approval is based on clinical studies that demonstrated that subcutaneous administration of Rituxan Hycela resulted in similar levels of the antibody in...

  • Missouri AG: Fraud and deceit by drug makers led to opioid epidemic

    Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley discusses the state's lawsuit against large pharmaceutical companies about the country's opioid epidemic. CNBC's Meg Tirrell weighs in.

  • *Canakinumab promises new way to fight heart attack risk. ZURICH/ LONDON, June 22- A Novartis anti-inflammatory drug cut cardiovascular risk for heart attack survivors in a pivotal trial, potentially changing ideas about treatment. Baader Helvea analyst Bruno Bulica said Novartis's findings were "a ground-breaking discovery likely to transform the...

  • ZURICH/ LONDON, June 22- A Novartis drug designed to reduce inflammation has shown surprising efficacy in cutting cardiovascular risk for people who had survived a heart attack, potentially changing ideas about treatment and boosting the company's shares. Canakinumab, also called ACZ885, met its primary endpoint in a pivotal clinical trial in reducing the...

  • WASHINGTON— An experimental drug is showing promise against an untreatable eye disease that blinds older adults— and intriguingly, it seems to work in patients who carry a particular gene flaw that fuels the damage to their vision. Age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, is the leading cause of vision loss among seniors, gradually eroding crucial central...

  • NEW YORK— The flu vaccine did a poor job protecting older Americans against the illness last winter, even though the vaccine was well-matched to the flu bugs going around. U.S. health officials on Wednesday released new vaccine data showing it did a so-so job overall. The vaccine was about 42 percent effective in preventing illness severe enough to send a patient...

  • Otto Frederick Warmbier (C), a University of Virginia student who was detained in North Korea since early January, is taken to North Korea's top court in Pyongyang, North Korea, in this photo released by Kyodo March 16, 2016.

    Otto Warmbier, an American college student who was released by North Korea in a coma, has died in Ohio at age 22.

  • June 19- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved a new treatment for patients with acute bacterial skin infections, made by privately held Melinta Therapeutics. The drug, Baxdela, or delafloxacin, is designed to treat skin and skin structure infections caused by a range of bacteria, including methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, or...

  • Lab work at Spark Therapeutics in Philadelphia, PA.

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports on the biotech surge from Clovis and Tesaro as they compete in the same medical space.

  • June 19- Seattle Genetics Inc said it would halt a late-stage study of its drug to treat a type of leukemia in older patients following a "higher rate" of deaths in patients on the drug compared with those on a placebo. Shares of the U.S. drug developer fell as much as 11 percent to $57.40 in early trading on Monday, but recouped some losses to be down about 3.7 percent.

  • "Young people may be dying because they are not getting the treatment they need," said Brendan Saloner, an addiction researcher at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who wrote an editorial published with the study Monday in JAMA Pediatrics. Scott Hadland of Boston Medical Center. Doctors must become more comfortable treating addiction with...

  • Clovis surges on positive cancer-drug data

    CNBC's Meg Tirrell reports the latest biotech and health care news including Clovis Oncology's new ovarian cancer drug study sending shares up.

  • June 19- Clovis Oncology Inc said on Monday late-stage data on its already-approved ovarian cancer drug showed that the treatment could benefit four times as many patients, sending shares of the U.S. biotech soaring 50 percent. Rubraca, like Tesaro Inc's Zejula and AstraZeneca Plc's Lynparza, belongs to a closely watched class of new medicines called PARP...

  • Shares of Seattle Genetics fell 14 percent to $55.50 in premarket trading. In December, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had imposed a clinical hold on several early-stage studies testing vadastuximab talirine after six AML patients were identified with liver toxicity and four died. Seattle Genetics said it would consult the FDA regarding future plans...

  • June 19- U.S. drug developer Seattle Genetics Inc said on Monday it would halt a late-stage study of its drug to treat old patients with acute myeloid leukemia, a form of blood cancer, due to safety concerns. The trial data showed a higher rate of deaths in patients who took the drug, vadastuximab talirine, compared to those on a placebo, the company said.