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Business Mexico

  • Mexico, overshadowed by Brazil for years, has secured its place as the new favorite among investors looking to put cash into Latin America.

  • A dramatic shift in how energy is being produced and consumed around the world could lead to far-reaching changes in the geopolitical order.

  • A contribution rate close to three percent, the lowest in the advanced world, is just one reason why American workers lag behind other developed countries in retirement savings.

  • An employee works on the production line at a Volkswagen assembly plant in Puebla, Mexico.

    With the yuan strong, some manufacturing companies are moving out of China and closer to the United States—to Mexico. USA Today reports.

  • Men with Cabot Oil and Gas work on a natural gas valve at a hydraulic fracturing site on January 18, 2012 in South Montrose, Pennsylvania.

    NBC News and CNBC look at the implications US energy independence would have for the economy, other types of energy, foreign policy and the environment.

  • What's Up with the Peso?

    Investors dive into the peso. The peso jumps after S&P upgrades the Mexican credit outlook to positive from stable. Profiting from a popping peso, with CNBC's Amanda Drury and the Money In Motion traders.

  • Here's a hint: It's not because of increased immigration enforcement or border violence.

  • Cruise lines are rolling out huge discounts and extras to help potential passengers forget the disaster and illness that have plagued the industry lately. And for some -- it's working!

  • Some workers have their lunch in one of the subway tunnels of the new train line 12 that is under construction and could be open to the public use this year with 20 stations in Mexico city.

    Brazil's economy promises to expand and infrastructure stocks should see more interest as the country gets ready for 2014 World Cup.

  • AB Inbev

    The Justice Department and AB InBev asked a court for a short delay as the Budweiser parent seeks to save a $20 billion beer deal.

  • 'Currency wars' will come to Moscow on Friday as finance officials from the Group of 20 nations spar over Japan's expansive policies that have driven down the value of the yen.

  • Opt for Brazil, Mexico Debt: Pimco

    Mike Amey, portfolio manager at Pimco, says he favors bonds from countries like Brazil and Mexico, despite market speculation of a looming emerging market debt bubble.

  • Smurfit Kappa Raises Dividends

    Gary McGann, CEO of Smurfit Kappa Group, talks about the challenges in the packaging business but said there would be ebbs and flows throughout the year.

  • Santelli Exchange: DOJ Goes After S&P

    CNBC's Rick Santelli discusses what worries him about bank liquidity in Mexico, and weighs in on the Justice Department's civil lawsuit against Standard & Poor's.

  • Focus on Emerging Markets

    Martin Lakos, Division Director at Macquarie Private Wealth talks about the focus on emerging markets particularly Mexico, India and Thailand.

  • The world's top economic policymakers are likely to discuss how Japan's new monetary and fiscal policy drive is weakening the yen when they meet next month, but will stop well short of calling it a competitive devaluation, G20 officials said.

  • Mexico's Fin Min: We Have Done Our Work

    Luis Videgaray, Mexico's finance minister, tells CNBC that Mexico is now a stable economy with low inflation, a balanced budget and a strong well capitalised banking system.

  • Why Has the Gloss Come Off Brazil?

    James Lockhart Smith, head of Latin America at Maplecroft, tells CNBC that Brazil has some real problems with its growth story, including a high cost of doing business.

  • Demonstrators take part in a protest against government's health cuts and privatisation plans in Madrid on December 16, 2012.

    Latin American markets have been a prime target for Spanish companies because of their language advantage, and giants such as Telefonica and Banco Santander have increased their exposure there to compensate for problems in their domestic market.

  • A van covered by a mural sits parked outside a Walt-Mart Super Center in Mexico City, Saturday, April 21, 2012.  Wal-Mart Stores Inc. hushed up a vast bribery campaign that top executives of its Mexican subsidiary carried out to build stores across Mexico, according to a published report by the New York Times. Wal-Mart is Mexico's largest private employer. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

    U.S. lawmakers on Thursday released documents they said showed Wal-Mart Stores' CEO was informed in 2005 of Mexico bribery allegations.