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Business Middle East

  • Saudi youth wave their national flag as they celebrate the return of King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz in the Saudi capital Riyadh.

    Saudi Arabian policymakers will keep a careful eye on inflation in the coming months, following two massive infusions of stimulus money that they hope will support the Arab world's largest economy without driving domestic prices much higher.

  • Qatar PM's Investment in the U.S.

    A look at what one big money player in the commercial real estate industry is buying, with Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Bin Jabr al-Thani, Qatar's prime minister, and CNBC's Maria Bartiromo.

  • Souk Waqif at dusk Doha, Qatar.

    While the rest of the world wallows in economic turmoil and crippling deficits, the Persian Gulf nation of Qatar can’t spend money fast enough — literally.

  • The Palm Tower, Al Bidda Tower, and The Burj Qatar in Doha, Qatar.

    Finding Qatar on a map may be as difficult as learning how to pronounce the country's name.  But analysts say that shouldn't stop investors from targeting the small desert nation—as long as they understand the business culture .

  • Qatar, an emirate that is slightly smaller in land size than Connecticut, has leapt onto the global economic scene with its vast natural resources, wealth, and relative stability. Ruled by Emir Hamad bin Khalifa Al Thani since 1996, it's one of the fastest growing economies in the world, growing by 19.4% in 2010 alone. Executives from several of Qatar’s major corporations as well as government leaders will convene at the Waldorf Astoria in New York City April 6-7, 2011, for the Business & Invest

    So, what should you know about Qatar, and what are some of its key economic characteristics? Click for an economic tour.

  • Today's Market Outlook

    Kevin Ferry, Cronus Futures Management, discusses what happened in overnight trading as well as what he wishes would happen with the Fed. And the House tries to ban the EPA from regulating greenhouse gases, with Rep. Ed Whitfield (R-Ky.) Energy & Commerce Committee.

  • Oil Refinery

    Oil prices have recovered from a short sharp sell-off late last month to hit fresh highs but could be about to sell off again, according to Julian Jessop, the chief international economist at Capital Economics.

  • A rebel militiaman stands guard at a Libyan oil refinery in rebel-held territory on February 27, 2011 in Al Brega, Libya. The opposition leadership has stressed that oil faciities in areas under its control are safe, despite the conflict roiling the country.

    Libyan rebels are set for their first oil export as soon as Tuesday as they seek funding to sustain their uprising against Muammer Gaddafi's 41-year rule of the north African nation, the Financial Times reports.

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    The bullish drivers behind oil—the Mid-East crisis, weaker dollar and low interest rates—are not slowing down and that means the probability of a black gold rush should continue. But while events drive this commodity every higher over the short term, will the spike continue over the long term?

  • What's Trading Now

    Silver and the gold, and the commodities trade doesn't appear to coming to a close, with CNBC's Scott Wapner and the Fast Money Halftime Report traders. Also, a look at the microchip trade, and what it will take for stocks to break out now, with Carter Worth, Oppenheimer.

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    With stocks shrugging off the wall of worry in the first quarter, the second quarter could prove to be a less rewarding time for those long equity markets as central banks begin to tighten policy via rate hikes or withdrawing extraordinary measures.

  • Libyan rebels gather on the frontline as smoke from a burning oil facility darkens the sky in Ras Lanuf, Libya.

    A Libyan government envoy has begun a trip to Europe to discuss an end to fighting, but gave no sign of any major climb down in a war that has ground to a stalemate between rebels and forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi.

  • These plays might be "glaringly obvious," but Cramer said they're making investors a lot of money.

  • Traders work in the ten-year U.S. Treasury Note options pit at the Chicago Board of Trade in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.

    From Libya to Larry Page, markets have absorbed an above-average amount of headlines so far in 2011. Let's take a quick look at some of the headlines beyond geo-politics and then put on the table what might happen next.

  • General unrest in the Middle East has had a "dramatic impact on oil prices," the chief executive of a major South African mining and energy company said Thursday—and he makes no secret of the fact that that's good news for his firm.

  • HSBC

    HSBC is cutting growth targets and raising inflation forecasts following dramatic rises in commodity prices that threaten the global recovery.

  • The "Mad Money" host said the market likes what it sees.

  • A Lybian rebel stands on March 22, 2011 as rebel forces massed for a second day on several kilometres from the key city of Ajdabiya to try to attack government forces that have encircled the town.

    A week or so before Obama launched the attack on Libya, we warned that while an air-campaign could likely ground Gadaffi’s air force—hopes that it would accomplish much more were unfounded.

  • Middle East Turmoil

    The President delivered an excellent speech Monday night on the situation in Libya. He covered the reasons, thoughts, negotiations with allies etc. that explained very well why he took the action he did. You actually didn't need to watch the speech. You don't even have to read the transcript today. All you have to do is look at where the story is positioned in the papers to see how good it was.

  • China

    The world's biggest economies are recovering from the Great Recession at troublesome speeds: too fast or too slow.