×

Business Middle East

  • Inside the EgyptStock Exchange just before its reopening.

    The Egyptian stock exchange's broad index closed 8.95 percent lower on Wednesday in the first trading session since January.

  • oil_barrells_ap_200.jpg

    There could be less than 49 years of oil supplies left, even if demand were to remain flat according to HSBC’s senior global economist Karen Ward.

  • Bill Miller

    Here's what you should be watching Wednesday, March 23.

  • Egyptian security forces race through the streets near the scene Interior Ministry building that caught fire March 22, 2011 in downtown Cairo, Egypt.

    Fire swept the upper floors of Egypt's Interior Ministry building on Tuesday as policemen protested outside to demand higher pay. A security official accused demonstrators of starting the blaze in downtown Cairo.

  • Bahraini anti-government protesters stand close to makeshift roadblocks in Manama.

    Armed security forces and light tanks were visible Tuesday in Bahrain's financial harbor as the local press ran headlines heralding the resumption of "business as usual" and displaced expats began to slowly trickle back to the island kingdom.

  • Conflict in Context

    Thoughts on the conflicts in the Middle East, with Steve Cook, Council On Foreign Relations senior fellow.

  • cairo_exchange_200.jpg

    The Egyptian stock exchange is prepared for big intraday moves with circuit breakers, but a period of sustained losses is anticipated, according to the market's new chairman, Mohamed Abdelsalam.

  • A Libyan jet bomber crashes after being shot down in Benghazi on March 19, 2011 as Libya's rebel stronghold came under attack, with at least two air strikes and sustained shelling of the city's south sending thick smoke into the sky.

    As anti-aircraft fire rang out across Tripoli for the third night in a row and US airstrikes yet to slow, one analyst told CNBC that there is a very real chance of Libya being divided between the Gaddafi-controlled West and rebel-controlled East.

  • 1st paragraph of story should go here

  • Anti-Gaddafi rebel runs away as smoke rises following an air strike by Libyan warplanes.

    Fears that the world economy is facing another downturn are being overplayed, despite the political upheaval caused by recent unrest in the Middle East and the earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan, Jim O'Neill, chairman of Goldman Sachs Asset Management, said.

  • economy_down1.jpg

    Caveat emptor: The first-quarter economy is slowing and inflation is rising. A month ago, economists were optimistic about the potential for 4 percent growth. Now they are marking down their estimates toward 2.5 percent. Behind this, consumer expectations are falling while inflation fears are going up.

  • One euro and U.S. dollar

    Investors are so focused on the troubles in Japan and Libya that the euro is just strengthening on the sidelines, this analyst says. But for how long?

  • JetBlue Flight Plan  for $100 Oil

    A look at the airline's strategy for the rise in oil, with Dave Barger, JetBlue Airways chief executive officer.

  • Egyptian anti-government protesters wave a Tunisian flag along with national banners during continuing demonstrations in Cairo's landmark Tahrir Square.

    Egypt's stock exchange will re-open Wednesday after being closed for more than seven weeks, a spokesman for the exchange said on Monday after the country's new Prime Minister accepted the resignation of the exchange's chairman.

  • Saudi youth wave their national flag as they celebrate the return of King Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz in the Saudi capital Riyadh.

    Saudi Arabia's plan to shell out some $90 billion as part of a state-backed economic aid package continued to buoy regional markets Monday, but it is too early to tell how much the spending package will do to assuage sectarian tensions in the country, market analysts told CNBC.

  • The past week saw plenty of action in the currency markets, but commodities went on a ride as well. From "Money In Motion", tips on using currencies to trade commodities.

  • Changing Global Outlook

    CNBC's Steve Liesman takes a look at how economists are changing their forecasts in response to recent events.

  • Having analyzed the impact on the dollar of numerous wars and military interventions in the Middle East since 1973, Bank of New York Mellon is telling investors that the greenback should hold up well as the international community imposes a no-fly zone over Libya.

  • With civil unrest spreading from the Middle East to other countries around the world with the help of social networking, it seems that no authoritarian ruler is safe. With this in mind, the question is who's next? The sudden disintegration of the multi-decade rule of leaders like Hosni Mubarak suggests that other long-standing dictators could go.Although Venezuela's Hugo Chavez and North Korea's Kim Jong Il draw the world's attention, the list of rulers considered to be dictators is a long one.A

    So, which dictators have been in power the longest and how have their economies fared under their rule? Find out!

  • President Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama demanded Friday that Moammar Gaddafi halt all military attacks against civilians and said that if the Libyan leader did not stand down the United States would join in military action against him.