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Business Middle East

  • And here's how market pros recommend cashing in on the rising inflation trade.

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    The $20 a barrel jump in oil prices means the US will pay an added $69.3 billion this year, more than it costs to run most US agencies.  The falling dollar ensures US consumers are hardest hit.

  • Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak

    Egypt's former President Hosni Mubarak and his two sons will appear before a Cairo court on Tuesday, April 19, for questioning, state television said on Wednesday.

  • Oil: Inventories and the Total Cost

    Crude supplies are up over a million barrels, but the decline in gasoline is far more than analysts were expecting, reports CNBC's Sharon Epperson. Also, a look at the recent rise in oil prices, and the hunt for cheap oil, with Addison Armstrong, Tradition Energy, and CNBC's Simon Hobbs.

  • Commodities Tomorrow

    CNBC's Sharon Epperson discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets, and looks ahead to where oil is headed, particularly in light of Goldman Sachs' recommendation that investors take profits.

  • Here's what you should be watching Tuesday, April 12.

  • An anti-government protestor holds a blooded Egyptian flag in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

    In Sunday’s trade, the Egypt Stock Exchange lost 1.42%, and the coming few trading sessions are likely to reflect how worried the remaining foreign investors are about the renewed violence in Tahrir Square.

  • Money File: What a Week for Euro

    The plot thickens even more this weekend as European finance ministers meet to work out the terms of a rescue plan for Portugal. Brian Kelly, Kanundrum Capital, tells viewers why the Euro contagion was contained, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Money In Motion traders.

  • Money In Motion, April 8, 2011

    A weekly look at currency trading and how to profit from it, with CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Money In Motion traders.

  • Commodities Next Week

    CNBC's Sharon Epperson discusses the day's activity in the commodities markets, and looks ahead to where oil, gold, silver and copper are likely headed Monday.

  • The 39th President of the United States Jimmy Carter

    The Misery Index is a simple calculation that became a political hot potato in the late 1970s and early 1980s. By adding the unemployment rate and inflation together, the index gave policy makers a tool by which to measure economic misery.  As President Barack Obama prepares for his re-election run, the index stands at just 11 percent, some 10 percent lower than Carter faced 31 years ago.

  • An anti-government protestor holds a blooded Egyptian flag in Tahrir Square on February 3, 2011 in Cairo, Egypt.

    In Egypt's government ministries, factories and especially universities, daily protests have focused on those viewed as Mr. Mubarak’s surrogates, the New York Times reports.

  • Rex Tillerson

    As crude oil hit new a new multi-year high on Thursday, closing above $110 a barrel, Exxon Mobil Chairman Rex Tillerson told CNBC natural has is the fastest-growing conventional fuel and that demand will 60 percent by 2030.

  • NYSE Trader

    Corporate hedging, the science of locking in predetermined prices to insure against future, has been around since at least the 1980s. But a combination of global diversification over the last decade and a rash of geopolitical events from Japan to Libya are causing many companies to reemphasize the importance of their hedging, say traders and corporate executives.

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    The West's attempts to kick-start growth have opened up a 'Pandora's Box' of economic distortions that have taken the emerging world to the outer reaches of economic experimentation, according to HSBC chief economist Stephen King.

  • A man walks outside the Bank of Greece headquarters during a demonstation against government's austerity measures in central Athens.

    Greece has remained the world’s riskiest sovereign debt for the second quarter running in the first quarter of this year, according to a report by independent credit market data provider CMA.

  • Young Indian Muslims pose with placards during a protest rally against the ongoing political turmoil in Bahrain, Libya, and Yemen.

    Bahrainis and expats living in the Kingdom of Bahrain have been living history over the past month as the events in Tunisia and Egypt inspired the mostly Shia majority in Bahrain to take the streets demanding political, economic and social reform.

  • BENGHAZI, LIBYA - FEBRUARY 25: Libyans protest demanding the removal of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi following Friday prayers on February 25, 2011 in Benghazi, Libya. Benghazi residents mourned more victims of the violence as fighting continued around the capitol Tripoli.

    Middle East governments moving away from dictatorship must deliver quick wins through job creation to meet immediate hopes of street protesters but longer-term reforms need to ensure a more inclusive society, the head of the World Bank said on Wednesday.

  • Qatar's Foreign Policy

    Sharing his thoughts on the situation in Libya and the work his country is doing in infrastructure,with Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Bin Jabr al-Thani, Qatar prime minister and CNBC's Maria Bartiromo.

  • Behind Qatar's Growth

    Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Bin Jabr al-Thani, prime minister & minister of foreign affairs, state of Qatar, discusses some of his country's economic success stories with CNBC's Maria Bartiromo.