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Business Middle East

  • stock_markets_index_200.jpg

    With stocks shrugging off the wall of worry in the first quarter, the second quarter could prove to be a less rewarding time for those long equity markets as central banks begin to tighten policy via rate hikes or withdrawing extraordinary measures.

  • Libyan rebels gather on the frontline as smoke from a burning oil facility darkens the sky in Ras Lanuf, Libya.

    A Libyan government envoy has begun a trip to Europe to discuss an end to fighting, but gave no sign of any major climb down in a war that has ground to a stalemate between rebels and forces loyal to Muammar Gaddafi.

  • These plays might be "glaringly obvious," but Cramer said they're making investors a lot of money.

  • Traders work in the ten-year U.S. Treasury Note options pit at the Chicago Board of Trade in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.

    From Libya to Larry Page, markets have absorbed an above-average amount of headlines so far in 2011. Let's take a quick look at some of the headlines beyond geo-politics and then put on the table what might happen next.

  • General unrest in the Middle East has had a "dramatic impact on oil prices," the chief executive of a major South African mining and energy company said Thursday—and he makes no secret of the fact that that's good news for his firm.

  • HSBC

    HSBC is cutting growth targets and raising inflation forecasts following dramatic rises in commodity prices that threaten the global recovery.

  • The "Mad Money" host said the market likes what it sees.

  • A Lybian rebel stands on March 22, 2011 as rebel forces massed for a second day on several kilometres from the key city of Ajdabiya to try to attack government forces that have encircled the town.

    A week or so before Obama launched the attack on Libya, we warned that while an air-campaign could likely ground Gadaffi’s air force—hopes that it would accomplish much more were unfounded.

  • Middle East Turmoil

    The President delivered an excellent speech Monday night on the situation in Libya. He covered the reasons, thoughts, negotiations with allies etc. that explained very well why he took the action he did. You actually didn't need to watch the speech. You don't even have to read the transcript today. All you have to do is look at where the story is positioned in the papers to see how good it was.

  • China

    The world's biggest economies are recovering from the Great Recession at troublesome speeds: too fast or too slow.

  • Here's what you should be watching Thursday, March 30.

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    The list of trip wires for the markets is getting longer. We decided to do a little trouble shooting to see if there are others lurking out there for 2011.

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    The volatility switch has flipped in the energy sector, creating opportunities for investors ready to buy at increasingly attractive entry points in what may be a repeat of the 2008 mega-rally.

  • Barack Obama

    President Barack Obama told Americans on Monday the United States would work with its allies to hasten the day when Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi leaves power, but would not use force to topple him.

  • Word on the Street

    Oil pulls back on Libyan rebel successes, while explorers and refineries rise. At the same time, coal stocks slide after Goldman downgrades Peabody. And smaller telecom stocks make a big comeback after the AT&T/T-Mobile marriage, with Will Power, RW Paird analyst, CNBC's Melissa Lee and the Fast Money traders.

  • Libyan rebels progress westward from the town of Bin Jawad towards Muammar Gaddafi's home town of Sirte on March 28, 2011 as NATO finally agreed to take over full command of military operations to enforce a no-fly zone in Libya from a US-led coalition.

    Libyan rebels in Benghazi say they have formed their own central bank.

  • Young Indian Muslims pose with placards during a protest rally against the ongoing political turmoil in Bahrain, Libya, and Yemen.

    Fresh reports of violent clashes and midnight raids taking place over the weekend did nothing to stifle a steady stream of traffic through Bahrain's financial district Monday, nor did the continued presence of foreign troops and tanks keep business from re-opening their doors.

  • Middle East Unrest & Oil

    An outlook on the oil market as the unrest in the Middle East shows no signs of calming down, with John Hofmeister, former Shell Oil president/CEO, U.S. Operations.

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    The twin shocks of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan and the rise in oil prices will not greatly alter growth prospects for 2011 and 2012, according to Willem Buiter, chief economist at Citigroup.

  • This footage purportedly show protests in the southwestern town of Daraa on 18th March 2011.

    Instability has spread to nations that the United States considers vital to its interests and to chances for peace in the Middle East, the New York Times reports.