Entertainment Movies

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    After two years of prodding from Hollywood, the F.C.C. agreed to let movie studios activate technology to prevent films sold through video-on-demand systems from being copied.  That could open the door to a new era, the NYT reports.

  • TV

    After years of moaning about the death of broadcast TV as viewers move online and to cable, the broadest business is looking pretty healthy.

  • Mark Zuckerberg

    Zuckerberg is a product of public schools and the elite Phillips Exeter Academy, but none of his schooling took place in New Jersey. So why Newark? Why now?

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    Blockbuster failed to update its brick-and-mortar model to compete in the fast-paced digital age, and it's been trounced by Netflix and Redbox.

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    Goldman Sachs' Communacopia hosted some major media CEOs Wednesday afternoon: the mood was upbeat with advertising on the rebound. They also had plenty to say about the value of content — and protecting that content — in the new digital landscape.

  • The failings of brick-and-mortar distribution models in film and entertainment, as seen in the shortly-anticipated bankrupty of film retailer Blockbuster, is opening the doors for new dealmakers in Hollywood, chairman and founder of Colony Capital Tom Barrack told CNBC Wednesday.

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    Despite plenty of talk about consumers ditching their cable service, Angelakis says he's not concerned about customers "cutting the cord."

  • The long slow demise of Blockbuster that will culminate with an imminent bankruptcy filing provides another example of how the failure to effectively respond to changes in the distribution of content can doom an enterprise.

  • AOL

    AOL CEO Tim Armstrong took the stage at Goldman Sachs' Communacopia conference and made a few headlines about his plans to create a next-generation digital content company.

  • Goldman Sachs annual media and technology conference — Communacopia — kicked off today with optimism and bullish comments from AT&T's CEO Randall Stephenson and Disney CEO Bob Iger. The event is a who's who of media, tech and telecom CEOs; the economy is top of mind, as is digital distribution and the growing smart phone and tablet market.

  • Halo - Reach

    Microsoft's "Halo: Reach" hit $200 million dollars in sales in just its first 24 hour on store shelves. That makes it the biggest debut of any movie or game so far this year. But how much will Microsoft actually make? And how does that compare to a blockbuster movie opening?

  • Halo Reach

    It's a great week for the video game industry — several pieces of positive news for investors in the game business. But despite the upbeat news, game stocks slid Thursday with Activision Blizzard down nearly 5%. So what happened?

  • Four years ago he committed his studio to produce all its films in 3D, at considerable cost; now he says the bet has entirely paid off. He boasts that despite the recession 3D is growing, and helping the box office grow.

  • Halo - Reach

    Analysts tell me that based on pre-sales and last night's turnout "Halo:Reach" is on track to be the biggest Halo game yet, selling some seven million copies by year-end.

  • Lionsgate’s African-American-focused film business, anchored by Tyler Perry titles, has become a gold mine for the studio. Movies with predominantly black casts that tell stories rooted in black culture — surprise! — bring out a sizable black audience.  Now Lionsgate is trying to pull off the same trick with Hispanic-focused films.

  • Oliver Stone

    If one man epitomizes the populist view of Wall Street and corporate America, it is director Oliver Stone, whose new film, “Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps” opens next week.

  • Lady Gaga celebrates in the Press room after receiving receiving eight 2010 MTV Video Music Awards including 'Video of the Year' at the Nokia Theater in Los Angeles

    MTV stacked the show with plenty of pop star performances, actors presenting awards, and jokes designed to stoke last year's Kanye West-Taylor Swift showdown. And MTV used one of its hottest assets to drive up numbers, debuting a new episode of Jersey Shore at 7 pm, right ahead of the awards show.

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    It's a big day for cable television — Martha Stewart, a queen of broadcast syndication, is moving to cable, kicking off a partnership with the Hallmark Channel. In a new five-year deal Stewart's signature show and other Martha Stewart Omnimedia programming will run on Hallmark Channel from 10 am to 6 pm. This speaks volumes about the business model for a brand like Stewart, and the changing television landscape.

  • Zombies

    Back to your coffins, vampires, it's zombie time. The latest sign that zombies are invading our popular consciousness — one university is offering a course on the shuffling flesh eaters.

  • Direct TV

    DirectTV is nearing an all-time high — pushing a major resistance level: shares closed at $39.77 Wednesday, up 4 percent over the last five days and 57 percent over the past 12 months.

Entertainment

Television