Entertainment Movies

  • A ray of light for movie theaters struggling with a weak summer box office: Cinema ads are on the rise. The Cinema Advertising Council released a new report on movie theater ads.

  • TV

    Advertising industry insiders tell me that Fox should wrap up its ad sales today and all the networks could complete their Upfront sales in a week. That's weeks earlier than the July 4 date expected, and months earlier than last year.

  • facebook_founder1.jpg

    In response, Zuckerberg addressed the issues without being defensive, reiterating that he wanted Facebook to help people share and stay connected, the message he told me last week after announcing the new privacy settings.

  • AT&T

    Today AT&T announced a big change in how it's charging for data—dropping unlimited, flat-fee plans, in favor of tiered pricing. This is a major shift, which should have rippled throughout telecom, and even into cable.

  • lions_gate_logo.jpg

    Tuesday afternoon Lionsgate issued its fiscal fourth quarter and full-year earnings results, following on the higher EBITDA earnings it pre-released five weeks early in the heat of the battle with Carl Icahn.

  • Hollywood

    Hollywood's strong box office run so far this year came to a screeching halt Memorial Day weekend, as movies' theatrical performance fell off a cliff.

  • Sex And The City 2

    The huge expectations for "Sex & The City 2" are truly a testament to the power of the female consumer. And that means a range of consumer product companies are waiting to cash in on the film's debut this weekend.

  • Box Office Gross: N/ATHE iconic film of its decade, it spoke to a disaffected anti-establishment "turn on, tune in, drop out" generation of hippies and non-hippies alike It also launched the starring career of Jack Nicholson.

    Dennis Hopper, the high-flying Hollywood wild man whose memorable and erratic career included an early turn in "Rebel Without a Cause," an improbable smash with "Easy Rider" and a classic character role in "Blue Velvet," has died. He was 74.

  • California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger speaks at a dedication ceremony for the Universal Studios newly rebuilt New York Street backlot locations.

    The back lot is a favorite of tourists taking the Universal Studios tour — a tour that suffered a loss when the famous "Back to the Future" Clock tower set was damaged by flames. But the new back lot has a lot more to do with building a new destination for TV and movie productions than keeping tourists happy.

  • Simon Cowell

    Mr. Cowell’s exit is the biggest material change in the eight-year history of the show. Many people credit him — a caustic, cocky judge — with making “Idol” into America’s most popular reality show and a profit center for the Fox  network, and some critics are questioning how compelling the show will be without him.

  • Sex And The City 2

    Studios used to slavishly target young males, considered the holy grail of a blockbuster movie openings. Now aspirational, stylish women have joined those ranks — they're already buying tickets to Sex & The City 2, which opens at 12:01 am Friday morning.

  • Shrek Forever After

    The film brought in $71 million, dominating the U.S. box office as the fourth highest animated movie opening ever. But this fell short of projections, and the number of tickets sold was down 59 percent from the prior Shrek's debut weekend.

  • Carl Icahn

    Today he announced he's extended his $7 a share tender offer for Lionsgate—for the third time. Instead of expiring this evening, his tender offer will now expire at 8 pm on June 1. This comes just days after Lionsgate and Icahn sat down for talks on alternative options, talks that don't seem to have gone anywhere.

  • Shrek Forever After

    Today DreamWorks' Animation's "Shrek Forever After" will open in over 4,300 theaters — more than half of them in 3-D. This, the fourth and last movie in the franchise, will be the green ogre's first venture into 3-D, and it should be a quite profitable one.

  • A sign is displayed outside of the Google headquarters in Mountain View, California.

    Google TV aims to eliminate the line between your computer and your television. It's designed to allow you to surf a range of websites and access online video from your couch.

  • Hollywood sign

    Hollywood is in the spotlight in Washington D.C.: today the CFTC hosted a hearing on controversial box office futures. Should people be able to trade expectations of box office performance just like they trade pork bellies or orange juice futures? The CFTC already approved two futures exchanges designed to trade box office derivatives; next month it faces deadlines to approve the proposed contracts.

  • Hollywood sign

    Federal regulators are voicing concerns about creation of a futures market for trading on movie box-office receipts.

  • Grand Theft Auto IV

    Video game sales may have plummeted 26 percent in April, but now there's hope that a new game will get the industry moving. "Red Dead Redemption" goes on sale today, and based on rave reviews and some anecdotal reports of huge lines outside Game Stop stores, this game could be a blockbuster.

  • Carl Icahn

    This is just the latest in the ongoing battle between the movie studio and Carl Icahn, who's attempting to take the company over for $7 a share. After facing a major setback last week Icahn isn't giving up without a fight.

  • An NBC sign stands at the NBC studios in Burbank, California.

    After a season of disappointing ad revenue, the further loss of viewers (and prestige) to cable networks, the end of popular series like “Lost” and “24” and the Jay Leno disaster at NBC, the broadcast networks are going back to an expensive drawing board.