Entertainment Movies

  • The Daily Show with Jon Stewart

    Hulu, the popular and free online video hub, has some things to celebrate as it heads into its third year.  But there are signs of dissatisfaction in Hulu’s house.

  • comcast_sign_200.jpg

    As Comcast awaits approval of its acquisition of NBC, the affiliates of rival stations are anxious to ensure that this mega-deal doesn't put them at a disadvantage to NBC. Earlier this week ABC, CBS and Fox affiliates sent a letter to Comcast, asking to set a meeting.

  • At the 7th annual Montgomery Tech conference there's a lot of talk about which company might be "the next Google."

  • verizon_fios.jpg

    Verizon has invested $29 billion to bring its FIOS Internet and TV service to 18 million homes, and now it's announced it's not going any further.

  • Bollywood dancers doing routine on set.

    I just got back from a ten day trip to northern India; I was on vacation but the media stories there were inescapable. Billboards, TV ads, and magazine covers reminded me that this is a massive new market for U.S. media giants and social networks.

  • Smartphones

    After a long period of trial and error—some of which is still going on—content providers and wireless technology companies are finding a robust appetite for mobile video.

  • youtube_new_logo.jpg

    YouTube is taking on MySpace head-on with a new system to monetize independent musicians' videos.

  • aol_93.jpg

    It's been almost a year since Tim Armstrong became CEO of AOL, and now he's at South By Southwest to show his commitment to making AOL a destination for original content.

  • Eighteen hundred bands, music industry execs, and thousands of fans are gathering in Austin for the annual South by Southwest music conference and festival.

  • 3D audience

    3-D is box office phenomenon, but it isn't just a boon for studios and theater chains — it's also big business a number of companies behind the scene.

  • ShoWest, the annual movie theater convention, kicks off today in Las Vegas, and everybody is talking about 3-D.

  • family watching tv

    Consumers are spending more and more time consuming entertainment — Americans spend an average of four hours EACH DAY watching video. But how they're spending their entertainment dollars is shifting.

  • Carl Icahn

    The power struggle between corporate raider Carl Icahn and studio Lionsgate is playing out slowly, with SEC filings and public statements lobbied back and forth.

  • Cable providers and content creators are battling over fees and consumers are bearing the brunt of it. Now the FCC is considering getting involved.

  • Conan O'Brien

    Conan O'Brien is taking advantage of all the attention he got when ousted from NBC and going on tour.

  • The mood is upbeat and venture capitalists, media and tech giants are out in force, hunting for deals at the seventh annual Montgomery Tech Conference in Santa Monica, California.

  • The Barbie and Ken versions of the “Mad Men” characters are, from left, Joan Holloway, Roger Sterling, Don Draper and Betty Draper.

    After three seasons, “Mad Men,” the television series about advertising in the 1960s, has attained a level of popular-culture cachet. There have been magazine cover articles, calendars and an episode of “The Oprah Winfrey Show” all devoted to it, spoofs on “The Simpsons” and “Saturday Night Live,” and even a “Mad Men” category on “Jeopardy.” Soon, the show will enter a realm of the pop-culture pantheon that its creator, Matthew Weiner, says has surprised even him: Mattel plans to bring out versions of Barbie and Ken styled after four “Mad Men” characters.

  • Fifteen minutes into the Academy Award presentation, Cablevision and WABC  announced that they've finally made enough progress to put the show on the air.

  • Jeremy Renner in a scene from "The Hurt Locker".

    "The Hurt Locker" is the lowest grossing film to ever win best picture and Kathryn Bigelow is the first woman to win 'Best Director.'

  • The Oscar red carpet may be dark Sunday night for some three million Cablevision subscribers. ABC and Cablevision are both sticking to their guns-- they didn't struck a deal ahead of the midnight deadline, when their contract expires. As many movie lovers feared, the Oscar broadcast on ABC could be collateral.