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Entertainment Movies

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    As investors, venture capitalists and entrepreneurs search for the "Next Big Thing," this week's Techonomy conference in Lake Tahoe, Calif. brings together companies whose innovation is driving economic growth. Here are four to keep your eyes on.

  • In today’s sports-crazed world, athletes like Lebron James and Tony Hawk have quickly become household names. But it’s not just their sport that’s making them famous. Athletes are becoming known for their entrepreneurship and savvy business deals—earning more off the playing field than on. From personalized apparel to multimillion dollar investment companies, see why these athletes truly “score” in the business world.

    In today’s sports-crazed world, athletes like Lebron James and Tony Hawk have quickly become household names. But it’s not just their sport that’s making them famous.

  • CBS

    CBS posted earnings two and a half times last year's earnings per share and 11 percent higher revenue — beating analyst expectations, on a combination of an ad recovery and operating efficiencies.

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    Discovery beat Wall Street expectations and raised its guidance slightly on broad-based advertising gains and international growth.

  • CBS

    CBS stock rose 3.5 percent Monday, a day ahead of its quarterly earnings, which are expected to be higher on rebounding ad spending. But that isn't the only good news for CBS: the company has announced that it struck a 10 year retransmission agreement with Comcast, to distribute CBS network, local stations, College Sports TV, Showtime and the Smithsonian channel.

  • 3D audience

    While Hollywood rushes dozens of 3-D movies to the screen — nearly 60 are planned in the next two years — a rebellion among some filmmakers and viewers has been complicating the industry’s jump into the third dimension, reports The New York Times.

  • Beach

    Americans are sick of "staycations": this summer they're leaving the  home and willing to spend for proper vacations. And travel stocks — hotels, cruise lines, and airlines — are reaping the benefits.

  • Six in 60

    Here's why you should keep a close eye on these six stocks.

  • News Corp.'s headquarters in New York.

    News Corp is seriously evaluating a move that would transform the digital news business. Sources close to the company tell me that CEO Rupert Murdoch is considering creating a new purely digital news venture and would be available through subscription on devices like the iPad.

  • Six in 60

    Take a look at why these six stocks are worth watching.

  • The message from media and tech companies is clear: advertising is back in a big way. This week both Sir Martin Sorrell, CEO of WPP and Disney CEO Bob Iger told CNBC that the ad market has improved from last year and continues to improve. We've seen that demonstrated in results from a diverse group of industry players, from tech giants to newspapers.

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    Amy Fisher, who has been called many things in her life, is about to add another title – porn magnate.

  • Six in 60

    Take a look at why these six stocks are worth watching.

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    I just broke the news that Disney has staked a serious claim in social gaming — it just finalized its acquisition of Playdom for $563.2 million. Disney could pay the social gaming company an additional $200 million if Playdom hits certain performance metrics over the next few years.

  • Barry Diller

    The Obama administration has engaged in a “consistent slamming of business,” IAC Interactive CEO and chairman Barry Diller told CNBC Monday.

  • Jon Hamm

    As the fourth season of the AMC series “Mad Men” kicks off, some of the show’s fans are gearing up to play another round of a peculiar language game: trying to spot flaws in the meticulously constructed dialogue portraying 1960s Madison Avenue.

  • Lindsay Lohan's booking photo.

    In what may be one of the more obscure tie-ins to the Lohan saga, the Insurance Information Network of California ran some numbers on what it might cost Lohan to legally drive in California.

  • Actress Angelina Jolie and producer Lorenzo di Bonaventura speak onstage at the 'Salt' panel during Comic-Con 2010 at San Diego Convention Center.

    The showcasing of “Salt,” which opens in theaters on Friday, struck many longtime conventiongoers as a tipping point.

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    The Milken Institute has released a report that finds that the flight of film and TV production from California has cost the state more than 36,000 jobs since 1997. That adds up to $2.4 billion in wages and $4.2 billion in total economic output lost in the past 13 years.

  • Fresh off its $4.2-billion acquisition of Marvel, Walt Disney has a lot riding on this year's trip to the Comic-Con International Convention. Although the acquisition brought perennial favorites like Iron Man and Spider-Man into its fold, one of Disney's biggest bets this year is on "Tron: Legacy," which will hit movie theaters in December.

Entertainment

Television

  • The FCC rewrote its rules last year that allowed companies to only partially count certain stations against the limit on ownership to those stations covering 39 percent of U.S. television households. FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said in a statement the FCC was likely to lose an ongoing lawsuit over the decision to revoke the rule in front of the U.S. Court of Appeals.

  • Media's mighty quarter

    CNBC's Julia Boorstin takes a look at why media stocks have been rallying despite attacks from President Trump. Barton Crockett, FBR Capital Markets senior analyst, weighs in.

  • US Sen. John McCain's colorful description of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is not going over well in the rogue nation.