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  • The big question looming over the newspaper and publishing business, is how to get consumers to pay for content online.

  • Disney is taking inspiration from its board member Steve Jobs, whose Apple stores have thrived despite the downturn in consumer spending.

  • As we await the media giants’ third quarter earnings, some optimistic signs are emerging that the ad markets may be about to turn around. Double-digit declines in ad spending across the board has particularly slammed companies like CBS, which relies on ads for more than two thirds of its revenue, and dragged down the results at ABC and NBC.

  • Media moguls from the West want to ensure that they generate revenue from digital distribution of their content, a message that seems particularly pointed against the backdrop of China, which is known for its rampant piracy.

  • Kindle 2

    It looks like this will be the holiday shopping season of the e-reader; we'll finally see some serious competition and affordable prices, which means the niche could finally take off.

  • The tech blogosphere is a buzz (or a-twitter depending on how you consume news) about reports that Twitter is in talks with Microsoft and Google to integrate Tweets into their search results.

  • As the Department of Justice scrutinizes Ticketmaster and LiveNation's proposed merger here in the US overseas the UK's main antitrust regulator already decided it has some problems with the combination of the ticketing giant and the world's largest concert promoter. This morning Britain's Competition Commission provisionally ruled against the planned merger, saying it "will limit the development of competition in the market for live music ticket retailing."

  • Sky-high marketing costs, usually half the budget of a movie, weigh heavily on studios balance sheets preventing them from taking more risks on releasing more movies. That's precisely why Hollywood is so carefully watching a little tiny movie called "Paranormal Activity" from Paramount, which may prove that a new model, hinging on the power of social media, really works.

  • Good news on the advertising outlook from J.P. Morgan, which this morning revealed some upbeat results from a proprietary survey about ad spending for the second half of the year.

  • Blogs and Twitter postings used to be the wild west of product endorsement. You never quite knew which mommy blogger was pushing a free stroller or whether a food critic had just enjoyed a luxurious night out on the house. Now the is trying to change all that.

  • Disney

    Monday night Disney appointed Rich Ross, the president of Disney Channels Worldwide, to take the post of Chairman of Walt Disney Studios, in hopes the success of its global Disney Channel will translate to the big screen.  

  • When news got out that Conde Nast was cutting 25 percent from many of its magazines' budgets, industry insiders speculated some magazines would cut back on the number of annual issues and that it would shutter one of its two food magazines. So today's news comes as a surprise: the publisher is shuttering Gourmet magazine, as well as Cookie, Modern Bride and Elegant Bride Magazine.

  • Now that The Washington Post Co. has ended its long-standing partnership with the Los Angeles Times it's launching a new service with Bloomberg News, honing in on its expertise with political and economic news.

  • MGM Studios

    MGM, the debt-laden privately held film studio, has been given a temporary reprieve on its interest payments.

  • Cash strapped consumers, even those far too lazy to clip anything out of a newspaper, can increasingly leverage technology to save at the grocery store check out. Going online to print out coupons seems simple and straightforward, but now there will be an even easier way for consumers to save.

  • Gannet

    This week all eyes are on Gannett; its stock has been flying higher, up more than 500 percent excluding dividends since hitting a low of $1.95 in March.

  • Warner Brothers

    The movie industry has been ruled by very specific rules about how and when different home video formats are released. The idea is that home video -- DVDs and video-on-demand -- has to come out long enough after a theatrical film release to keep moviegoers driving to movie theaters and paying for tickets.

  • YouTube and Warner Music Group have been stuck in a stand-off since December, when Warner pulled all of its artists' clips - both professional music videos and user-generated content using its songs - from the site.

  • Disney

    Today Disney announced the first-ever digital children's book platform, which also happens to be the media giant's first digital subscription business.

  • Ping Pong

    As Advertising Week wraps up here in New York, one major marketer, Budweiser, is sponsoring what it hopes will be the next hot sport to succeed Poker - Ping Pong!

Entertainment

Television

  • AMSTERDAM— Apple CEO Tim Cook said Tuesday that apps are the future of television and that the company wants to help change the entertainment industry. Cook was speaking at a meeting of tech and other startups in Amsterdam, two months after Apple announced software enhancements for its TV system, Apple TV, and knocked $50 off the price of its smart watch.

  • Watching TV

    As networks struggle to find shows that click, they're leaning heavily on what's worked in the past.

  • Jessica Long

    Surprising companies are stepping up to spotlight women athletes, who get only 4 percent of media coverage.