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Entertainment Movies

  • Toy Story 3

    "Toy Story 3" opens across the U.S. today on a record-setting number of 3-D screens. Now theater chains, Disney, and even its rival studios are anxiously hoping for a hit to turn around a weak summer box office: U.S. ticket sales are down over 6 percent since early May. Analysts

  • AOL

    Today AOL made it official: it's sold Bebo to Criterion Capital Partners. After buying the social network for $850 million in March 2008, the company said in an 8K SEC filing today "it will treat the common stock of Bebo as worthless." While that may be a big win from a tax perspective — the company expects to record a $275 million to $325 million tax benefit in the second quarter — it acknowledges a total disaster.

  • shrek4_140.jpg

    DreamWorks Animation stock tumbled after the animation studio warned 2Q earnings per share will be "meaningfully below" year-ago results. CFO and President Lew Coleman presented at William Blair & Company's Growth Stock Conference in Chicago, warning about second quarter earnings disappointments, and blaming the weakness on "Shrek Forever After," the fourth sequel in the Shrek franchise which was released May 21.

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    The FCC hosted an open hearing today to discuss how to seek the best legal framework for Internet regulation — the commission voted 3 to 2 to continue the re-regulation process. It's now moving closer to Chairman Julius Genachowski's proposal for a "third way," a selection of some of the stricter rules now regulating telecom.

  • Bambi, The Lion King, Finding Nemo — all animated films that have become household names while breaking all sorts of records. Their state-of-the-art technologies and design made them instant classics and some of the top-grossing movies of all time.Here, we've compiled the top 10 highest grossing animated movies, offering a behind-the-scenes view of their groundbreaking technology, from Disney's earliest full-length animated movie to Disney Pixar's newest releases. See why these movies changed th

    See why these movies changed the way animated movies are made, and broke box-office records in the process.

  • Pay $60 for a packaged game or get a variation of that content free online? That choice is putting pressure on game developers.

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    Blockbuster is trying to stave off bankruptcy, as the movie rental company faces a debt load of $930 million. Today I spoke exclusively with CEO Jim Keyes on his plans to keep the company afloat.

  • A line of people waiting to play Assassin's Creed from Unisoft.

    You'd never guess from game developers' E3 presentations that game software sales dropped 7 percent year-to-date through April. This is game companies once-a-year opportunity to roll out their schedule and get fans excited, appealing directly to the bloggers and fan sites that chronicle every upcoming game.

  • Xbox 360

    Video game makers love their core audience — men 18 to 40 who obsessively follow, buy, and play violent action games — but it's a finite one. Now game makers are looking much broader, to women and kids. The consoles are already in millions of Americans living rooms: now software makers just need to convince other members of gamers' families to spend on game software.

  • "Offspring" directed by Andrew van den Houten

    Among the states that began underwriting film and television production with heavy subsidies over the past half-decade — 44 states had some sort of incentives by last year, 28 of them involving tax credits — at least a handful are giving new scrutiny to a question that was politely overlooked in the early excitement: What kind of films are taxpayers paying for? The NYT explains.

  • After a long, drawn-out debate, the Commodities Futures Trading Association on Monday approved the first box office futures products.

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    Federal regulators have allowed a new online exchange to proceed to trade future box-office receipts for movies.

  • Playing Guitar Hero

    As E3 kicks off this week I spoke to Bobby Kotick, CEO of the largest video game maker Activision Blizzard for his insight into the future of the industry.

  • Toy Story 3

    After a disappointing Memorial Day weekend, Hollywood is still waiting for hit movies to energize ticket sales and box office receipts, reports NYT.

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    The fact that broadcast networks (and NBC in particular) are investing heavily in expensive content is appealing to advertisers. The networks have introduced 38 new shows, and 36 of those are scripted.

  • The match ball for the opening World Cup fixture between South Africa and Mexico.

    ESPN 3D's launch Friday with World Cup coverage marks the beginning of a whole new 3D advertising business. The channel announced it's launching with 3D commercials from Disney/Pixar's Toy Story 3, (corporate synergy), plus Sony and Gillette.

  • Disney World of Color

    The 400 amusement parks in the U.S. generate some $12 billion in annual revenue from more than 300 million annual visitors. Last year North American parks saw a one percent decline in attendance, but discounting prevented attendance from falling off further.

  • Sources tell me that ABC has finished its final upfront ad deals, and has secured 8 percent to 9 percent ad rates over last year. I don't have any details on the percentage volume increases ABC secured, but Disney's network has certainly sold closer to 80 percent of its inventory than the 65 or 70 percent the networks sold on average last year.

  • Big news from Take Two Interactive—it's sold five million copies of "Red Dead Redemption" since its May 18 debut. This blows away all projections: analysts expected the company to sell some three million copies in the entire quarter and up to five million copies for the rest of the fiscal year.

  • Gavel

    The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office issued a ruling against TiVo, over its rights to patent technology in the middle of a legal battle with Dish Network and EchoStar.

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