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Entertainment Movies

  • MGM Studios

    MGM's on the verge of announcing its bankruptcy and management plan, in the process of hammering out the final details right now with its 100 plus creditors.

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    Chatroulette, the random video-chatting site that became famous for its X-rated antics, may be getting ready to hit the "next" button. So, is it going to clean up its act?

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    In Senate primaries in Arizona, Florida and Alaska, veteran politicians are poised to brush back charges from insurgent outsiders and move on to the general election—possibly showing that the anti-incumbent mood of the electorate has started to soften.

  • If the cliche is that a best defense is a good offense, in Lionsgate's case, the best defense a bunch of middle-aged action stars.

  • I am totally distraught that our Move Flops slideshow contains one of my favorite movies.

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    Congratulations! You've just purchased a $7.6 million home. So what do you do now? If you answered "tear it down," you would be correct!

  • Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg

    At the New York Film Festival next month, Hollywood will unleash “The Social Network,” a biting tale of the Silicon Valley giant Facebook and its founder Mark Zuckerberg.  Now Facebook must decide whether to bite back, The New York Times reports.

  • Netflix shares have gained a whopping 185 percent over the past 12 months, but the stock is off from its all-time high it hit recently, now facing analyst downgrades and a slew of changes to the media landscape.

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    Facebook's long-awaited addition of the ability to "check in" could be a game changer for the social network's revenue stream.

  • AOL

    AOL is placing a major bet on the local news market — announcing today that it's expanding its Patch hyper-local news sites to 500 markets around the US. And, for a change, this is great news for the news profession.

  • Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg

    The trailer for the upcoming movie "The Social Network," about Facebook and its founder Mark Zuckerberg, is ripe for Internet riffing.

  • Julia Roberts in Eat, Pray, Love.

    Hollywood loves an established fan-base, and that's exactly what the 9 million people who bought best-seller "Eat, Pray, Love" are.

  • Google

    Today's news that Google is partnering with DirecTV to sell ads for cable networks could have far-reaching implications for Google and the ad business. This could be a win-win-win for Google, DirecTV, as well as advertisers, and it has the potential to shake up Madison Avenue.

  • Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger at the premier of The Expendables.

    State workers across the country have long complained about budget-cutting by way of furloughs and pay cuts. Now California’s state employee unions are taking the fight to the wellspring of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s popularity: the big screen. The NYT reports.

  • Disney beat Wall Street expectations, posting higher-than-expected revenue and earnings on strength at its media networks and a turnaround at its movie studio.

  • TV

    A new report out today from Veronis Suhler Stevenson forecasts spending on media and communications will outpace economic growth as consumers invest in mobile and web access and companies pay to reach them there.

  • Netflix set up a battle for broadband control of pay-per-view and the new world that we are just approaching.  The deal gives Viacom approximately  $1 billion dollars in licensing fees over five years—roughly $200 million a year.

  • Cinderella's Castle

    When Disney reports after the bell Wall Street will be looking for what the media giant can tell us about the strength of the American consumer.

  • Netflix

    In a sign that online streaming is coming to the forefront in Hollywood, films from Paramount Pictures, Lions Gate and MGM will appear on Netflix’s streaming service just three months after they appear on pay television. The NYT reports.

  • Illeana Douglas on "Easy To Assemble".

    After a protracted drought, money is trickling back into the professional Web video industry. So-called branded entertainment deals like the one by Ikea are becoming more common, helping to nourish new programming. The NYT reports.

Entertainment

Television