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  • The hot topic on the Street is the probability of a recession. Robert Albertson, chief strategist at Sandler O'Neill, and this morning Angelo Mozillo, CEO of Countrywide both voiced fears that a recession was coming. Opinions are sharply divided on this. David Bianco, UBS' Equity Strategist, said earlier this month that the S&P seems to be signaling a "financial sector recession" (i.e. that a recession is expected to mostly affect financial sector profits).

  • Stoked by positive developments on the credit and mortgage front, stocks are building on yesterday's gains and look ready to spring higher on the open.

  • Wall Street prepares for lift off on the opening amid calmer credit markets, higher world stock markets and some merger news. European stock markets are comfortably higher, and Asia closed higher though Japan stocks were flat on the rising yen.

  • Struggling subprime mortgage lender Accredited Home Lenders Holding on Tuesday said it agreed to sell $1 billion of home loans to an unnamed investor, a move it said would limit its exposure to margin calls.

  • Stock traders will be looking over their shoulders at the credit markets as a furious flight to quality into Treasuries keeps the pressure on stocks prices. For now, stock futures are higher and look set for a firmer opening.

  • Wall Street is set for a higher open after world stock markets rebounded in a Fed-inspired relief rally. Tokyo stocks were up 3%, the biggest gain in more than a year, in its first trading day since the Fed move. European stock markets, up sharply Friday, continue to rise this morning.

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    A bruising selloff in world stock markets is about to extract more pain on Wall Street, where stock index futures are pointing to a sharply lower opening.

  • Wall Street is bracing for a weaker opening, joining a sell off in stock markets around the world. Europe's major markets were lower after a selling spree across Asian markets, sparked by credit fears.

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    Stocks start the week on firmer ground after central bankers once again pumped cash into the markets, injecting confidence and liquidity. Stock markets around the globe gained, and U.S. stock futures are higher.

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    Wall Street is bracing for a sharply lower open as fears of a global liquidity crisis pound stock markets worldwide. Central banks around the globe stepped in to inject funds into the banking system and pump confidence back into markets, wary of the continued ripple effect of the U.S. subprime mortgage fallout.

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    The revelation that a unit of French bank BNP Paribas temporarily suspended three of its funds injected new fear into the markets, driving global stock sharply lower and casting a fresh chill across credit markets. The market fallout from BNP has reignited market speculation that the Fed will move to cut rates sooner, rather than later.

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    The Fed's comments yesterday calmed some of the credit angst in the markets and set the stage for a move higher in global equities. U.S. stocks are positioned to trade higher this morning, and Cisco's strong earnings news is adding some punch to the Nasdaq.

  • It’s the end of easy credit.  And that's made things difficult both for investors and would-be homeowners. CNBC talked to the experts on Tuesday on how best to survive the credit crunch. Here are some of their suggestions.

  • The Bernanke Fed is being put to its first big test as Fed watchers monitor its handling of the credit drama when it releases its statement at 2:15 p.m. The Fed's one day meeting is not expected to end with any adjustment in rates, but traders are hoping for a tweaking of the Fed statement with language that will soothe some of the anxiety about mortgage and credit markets.

  • Stocks are finding their feet on higher ground this morning as a positive tone embraces equities markets worldwide. Oil continues to back down from the new high struck earlier this week.

  • U.S. stocks futures are slightly firmer ahead of the opening in a market still cranky about credit worries and pondering the Fed's next move. European stock markets are mixed after trading lower this morning, and Asian stocks were lower overnight.

  • We are preoccupied with the death of the five-year equity bull market. Is this it? Are we witnessing one of those major trend turning points that are profitable for the brave and painful for the meek? Owning the market has worked -- but just as the bears capitulate there is a reminder of why they have been bearish.

  • A selling wave in global stock markets is sweeping futures lower this morning as subprime and credit woes once more rise to the surface. A new disclosure about a third troubled hedge fund at Bear Stearns is rattling investors.

  • Stocks are ready to spring higher on the opening as economic data, earnings and some merger news gets investor attention this morning. GM's better-than-expected earnings report is adding a positive tone.

  • Futures are perking up this morning and are setting stocks up for a firmer opening. Traders are turning their attention to earnings and some percolating merger news, and there's a calm on Wall Street after Friday's late day, mad dash down-hill ride for stocks.