Asia Top News and Analysis Myanmar

  • The lifting of Western sanctions on Myanmar, after it ended nearly 50 years of direct military rule, has pushed the door wide open for foreign investments into this resource rich country.Formerly known as Burma, the Southeast Asian country has attracted about $1.6 billion of foreign money over 2004-2010 with China its top investor. These inflows are expected to increase as more companies look to enter this frontier market that boasts of rich reserves of precious metals, oil and natural gas.A rec

    The lifting of Western sanctions on Myanmar, after it ended nearly 50 years of direct military rule, has pushed the door wide open for foreign investments into this resource rich country.

  • A rare view of Myanmar's Hidden Capital Naypyitaw.

    Many people tell me they want to visit this land of architectural wonders before hordes of others do during Myanmar’s awakening.

  • Workers assemble one of the many car models at Chinese carmaker's Chery Automobile plant.

    As Myanmar continues to remake itself anew, the country’s perplexing and outmoded laws of commerce are beginning to become more sensible. Among the more confounding laws govern car sales.

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    Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s Nobel Prize-winning opposition leader, will soon be able to sip a Coke in her own country. The FT reports.

  • Myanmar Opens Its Doors For Business

    Kevin Hewison, Visiting Professor at the Singapore Management University and Andrew Rickards, CEO, Yoma Strategic Holdings discuss Myanmar's prospects and challenges as the country opens its doors economically and politically.

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    PTT will help provide a fast-growing market for the natural gas from U.K.-listed Cove Energy’s east African fields, if it wins a bidding war with Royal Dutch Shell, the CEO of the company Pailin Chuchottaworn told CNBC.

  • Europe's elections cast a long shadow and Iran takes yuan - it's time for your FX Fix.

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    Spain weighs on the euro and nonfarm payrolls loom - it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Myanmar's president Thein Sein during a visit to Cambodia this month.

    He is sometimes called the Mikhail Gorbachev of Myanmar, a once-loyal apparatchik of one of the world’s most brutal military dictatorships who is chipping away at some of its worst legacies — freeing political prisoners, partially unshackling the press and allowing the long-persecuted opposition to run for election last Sunday. The NYT reports.

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    Manufacturing indicators abound, and Myanmar sets the kyat free — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Impact of Kyat Float on Myanmar Economy

    Andrew Rickards, CEO & Executive Director, Yoma Strategic Holdings discusses investment opportunities in Myanmar and the stabilizing impact floating the kyat will have on the economy.

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    Dipping consumer confidence lifts the dollar and a downward growth revision hits the pound - time for your FX Fix.

  • Who's Investing in Myanmar?

    Tony Nash, Managing Director, IHS Global Services reveals which countries & industries are dipping their toes into the Myanmar market.

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    The yuan slips and Myanmar gets ready to float - it's time for your FX Fix.

  • There was a wide-ranging change of the guard in 2011. In Europe struggling countries such as Italy and Greece brought in the technocrats, or voted out administrations, which had failed to solve their economic crises. In the Middle East two entrenched regimes toppled under popular uprisings and a third after a revolution.In 2012, there could be an even bigger shift, with several key countries facing possible changes at the top. Citizens that rid themselves of dictators and have not yet decided wh

    There was a wide-ranging change of the guard  in Europe and the Middle East in 2011. Here are 10 other elections that could change the game of global politics in 2012.

  • ** FILE ** Myanmar's pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, front right, smiles as she arrives at party headquarters in Yangon, Myanmar in this May 7, 2002 file photo. Hollywood and music stars, including Tim Robbins and Kate Pierson of The B-52s, have called on the United Nations to pass its first-ever resolution on Myanmar where a brutal offensive against ethnic minority people is continuing, a press release received Saturday, Dec. 16, 2006 said. (AP Photo/David Longstreath, File)

    Western governments lashed out at the extension of Nobel laureate Aung San Suu Kyi's house arrest, but the outrage at Myanmar's military rulers was tempered by concern over disrupting aid flows to desperate cyclone victims.

  • A village damaged by Cyclone Nargis is seen Thursday, May 22, 2008 in an aerial view over the Irrawaddy delta, Myanmar from the helicopter carrying United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon. (AP Photo/United Nations, Evan Schneider)

    The roads of the ravaged Irrawaddy Delta are lined these days with people hoping to be fed. After lifetimes living off the land, poor farmers have abandoned their ruined rice paddies, setting up makeshift bamboo shelters, waiting for carloads of Burmese civilians who have taken it on themselves to feed those who lost everything to Cyclone Nargis.

  • Myanmar soldiers carry sacks of rice, part of aid supplied by the Thai government, at an airport in Yangon, Myanmar Tuesday, May 6, 2008. Myanmar's Irrawaddy delta, where nearly 22,000 people perished, remained largely cut off from the rest of the world Tuesday, four days after a cyclone unleashed winds, floods and high tidal waves on the densely populated region. (AP Photo)

    The 68 blue tents are lined up in a row, with a brand-new water purifier and boxes of relief supplies, stacked neatly but as yet undelivered and not even opened.  But for the majority of Cyclone Nargis survivors, aid is something they've had no access to.

  • Myanmar soldiers carry sacks of rice, part of aid supplied by the Thai government, at an airport in Yangon, Myanmar Tuesday, May 6, 2008. Myanmar's Irrawaddy delta, where nearly 22,000 people perished, remained largely cut off from the rest of the world Tuesday, four days after a cyclone unleashed winds, floods and high tidal waves on the densely populated region. (AP Photo)

    U.N. chief Ban Ki-moon flew to Myanmar on Thursday to press the ruling generals to allow a full-blown international aid effort for 2.4 million people left destitute by Cyclone Nargis.

  • Myanmar soldiers carry sacks of rice, part of aid supplied by the Thai government, at an airport in Yangon, Myanmar Tuesday, May 6, 2008. Myanmar's Irrawaddy delta, where nearly 22,000 people perished, remained largely cut off from the rest of the world Tuesday, four days after a cyclone unleashed winds, floods and high tidal waves on the densely populated region. (AP Photo)

    Army-ruled Myanmar started three days of mourning on Tuesday for the 134,000 dead and missing from Cyclone Nargis as diplomats pressed the reclusive generals to speed up aid to 2.4 million survivors.