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  • ----PREVIOUS ITEMS: Axiata in Myanmar telecoms race-The Star----.

  • Taiwan's EVA Airways recently announced it will begin Yangon- Bangkok- Taipei flights on Oct. 19. Deputy Director of Civil Aviation Nweni Win Kyaw told The Associated Press several other airlines have recently announced direct flights to Yangon, including Korean Air, Japan's ANA and Germany's Condor.

  • MANILA, Oct 3- The Asian Development Bank released its revised 2012 outlook for 45 economies in developing Asia, which spans the Pacific to Central Asia. Central Asia: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan. South Asia: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka.

  • NEW VENTURE: Alisher Ali opened Myanmar's first-ever investment bank with $1 million of his own money. By the time Mandalay Capital closed its fundraising last month, Ali had raised $25 million.

  • Singapore shares rose after a surprising expansion in factory activity in the United States, with traders buying small and mid-cap stocks such as Tiger Airways Holdings Ltd and firms with exposure to Myanmar. The Straits Times Index was up 0.5 percent at 3,072.96 points, while the MSCI index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan added 0.3 percent.

  • UOB Kay Hian raised its target price on Super Group Ltd. 11:38 STOCKS NEWS SINGAPORE- Singapore Q3 home prices rise on mass-market growth. Singapore's private home prices in the third quarter rose 0.5 percent from the previous quarter, data from the Urban Redevelopment Authority showed, making it the highest rate of increase so far this year.

  • Golden Sule Pagoda, Rangoon, Myanmar

    In a dimly lit ballroom, Myanmar’s investment czar gushed about his nation’s dazzling future to a congregation of foreign investors. Each had paid $1,500 to hear the government’s big pitch: Long an economic basket case, Myanmar is now an investment gold mine.

  • Golden Sule Pagoda, Rangoon, Myanmar

    In a country where reportedly a quarter of the population lives in poverty and 70 percent live without electricity, a bubble sounds like an odd way to describe what is happening in a part of Myanmar. If the ultimate trophies for international investors are the nation’s rich resources, such as natural gas, tungsten and gems, let’s just call it a gold rush.

  • The lifting of Western sanctions on Myanmar, after it ended nearly 50 years of direct military rule, has pushed the door wide open for foreign investments into this resource rich country.Formerly known as Burma, the Southeast Asian country has attracted about $1.6 billion of foreign money over 2004-2010 with China its top investor. These inflows are expected to increase as more companies look to enter this frontier market that boasts of rich reserves of precious metals, oil and natural gas.A rec

    The lifting of Western sanctions on Myanmar, after it ended nearly 50 years of direct military rule, has pushed the door wide open for foreign investments into this resource rich country.

  • A rare view of Myanmar's Hidden Capital Naypyitaw.

    Many people tell me they want to visit this land of architectural wonders before hordes of others do during Myanmar’s awakening.

  • Workers assemble one of the many car models at Chinese carmaker's Chery Automobile plant.

    As Myanmar continues to remake itself anew, the country’s perplexing and outmoded laws of commerce are beginning to become more sensible. Among the more confounding laws govern car sales.

  • Coca-Cola bottles

    Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s Nobel Prize-winning opposition leader, will soon be able to sip a Coke in her own country. The FT reports.

  • Myanmar Opens Its Doors For Business

    Kevin Hewison, Visiting Professor at the Singapore Management University and Andrew Rickards, CEO, Yoma Strategic Holdings discuss Myanmar's prospects and challenges as the country opens its doors economically and politically.

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    PTT will help provide a fast-growing market for the natural gas from U.K.-listed Cove Energy’s east African fields, if it wins a bidding war with Royal Dutch Shell, the CEO of the company Pailin Chuchottaworn told CNBC.

  • Europe's elections cast a long shadow and Iran takes yuan - it's time for your FX Fix.

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    Spain weighs on the euro and nonfarm payrolls loom - it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Myanmar's president Thein Sein during a visit to Cambodia this month.

    He is sometimes called the Mikhail Gorbachev of Myanmar, a once-loyal apparatchik of one of the world’s most brutal military dictatorships who is chipping away at some of its worst legacies — freeing political prisoners, partially unshackling the press and allowing the long-persecuted opposition to run for election last Sunday. The NYT reports.

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    Manufacturing indicators abound, and Myanmar sets the kyat free — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Impact of Kyat Float on Myanmar Economy

    Andrew Rickards, CEO & Executive Director, Yoma Strategic Holdings discusses investment opportunities in Myanmar and the stabilizing impact floating the kyat will have on the economy.

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    Dipping consumer confidence lifts the dollar and a downward growth revision hits the pound - time for your FX Fix.