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  • Yoshikami: Four Days in Asia Monday, 28 Mar 2011 | 9:45 AM ET
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    The reality is, in this century, a global perspective is necessary when investing for portfolio success. Latin America, developing Europe, the Middle East, and Africa all hold promise. And without a doubt the brightest beacon for emerging growth today is Asia.

  • It's a rough day for the British pound, but the sun is shining down under — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • S&P Warns About ‘Excessive’ Bank Dividends Friday, 25 Mar 2011 | 7:30 AM ET
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    Standard & Poor’s issued a warning on Thursday to big banks itching to increase their dividends: proceed with caution, the New York Times reports.

  • Carrying On With the Yen Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 4:36 PM ET
    Japanese 10,000 Yen bank notes

    The yen may regain its status as a carry trade of choice now that the G7 has intervened to halt its rise. Is another rush into global assets coming?

  • TI Sees Japan Plant Back Online by September: CEO Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 1:24 PM ET
    Texas Instruments

    Texas Instruments still expects a company manufacturing facility in Japan to be back into full operation by September or earlier despite the massive earthquake and tsunami that struck the country, Rich Templeton, CEO of the company, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • How Nuclear Accidents Affected Markets 30 Days Later Thursday, 24 Mar 2011 | 12:55 PM ET
    Quake-damaged Fukushima nuclear power plant in Futaba, Fukushima

    A CNBC analysis of how markets reacted to previous nuclear accidents may help explain and predict the impact of the emergency in Japan.

  • Damaged houses, cars and debris after the earthquake

    Talk about a morning with wildly inconsistent messages about the auto industry's ability to build vehicles in the wake of the Japan earthquake and tsunami.

  • Troubles in Portugal and Spain aren't keeping the euro down, but anemic retail sales are doing a number on the British pound — it's time for your FX Fix.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Despite record inflows into the Japanese ETF, options traders are less than optimistic about a Japanese recovery.

  • Euro coin in front of the giant symbol of the Euro outside the headquarters of the European Central Bank.

    Here's what you should be watching Thursday, March 24.

  • Iridium: Literal High Flier Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 6:15 PM ET
    Iridium:  Literal High Flier

    The increases in mobile Internet traffic bodes well for satellite operators who can cover gaps in coverage. Iridium Communications is one worth keeping an eye on, says CEO Matt Desch, with Mad Money host Jim Cramer.

  • Cramer: This Is the 'Most Exciting' Stock In the Dow Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 3:19 PM ET

    Why the "Mad Money" host is bullish on this construction machinery name right now.

  • Fast Funds Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 12:52 PM ET
    Fast Funds

    A check on the Egyptian market, with John Gabriel, Morningstar EFT strategist.

  • A couple walks past upturned vehicles sitting on a wall in the city of Miyako

    Almost two weeks since an earthquake and tsunami devastated a large part of Japan and forced Japanese automakers to shut down their plants, there's a growing panic with American car buyers.

  • Yoshikami: How to Outsmart Global Crises! Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 11:06 AM ET
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    There is no shortage of challenges facing the world today and many investors are frozen waiting for clarity in these times of uncertainty. The problem is, in all likelihood, the world will not settle down any time soon and we will surely continue to see geopolitical shifts and unrest plaguing the investment world. So what are investors to do?

  • Japan Crisis Won't Derail ECB Rate Plans: Official Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 9:33 AM ET
    Jean-Claude Trichet

    The crisis in Japan following the devastating earthquake and tsunami that killed thousands of people will not have an effect on the European Central Bank's interest rate policy, Manfred Schepers, vice-president finance and chief financial officer for the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, told CNBC.

  • Diplomas, and an Uncertain Future, for Japanese Pupils Wednesday, 23 Mar 2011 | 2:21 AM ET
    A school pupil receives a graduation certificate during the graduation ceremony at Takkon Elementary School on March 22, 2011 in Ofunato, Iwate, Japan. The 9.0 magnitude strong earthquake struck offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave of up to ten metres which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan, and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant and threatening a nuclear catastrophe. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing exceeding 20,0

    Schools in Japan begin class in April and hold graduation ceremonies in March; like spring, they represent renewal and rebirth. On Tuesday morning, in a school meeting hall in the tsunami-ravaged seaport of Kesennuma, it became something else: an act of defiance. The NYT reports.

  • Employees of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant walk outside of the destroyed 4th block of the plant on February 24, 2011 ahead of the 25th anniversary of the meltdown of reactor number four due to be marked on April 26, 2011. Ukraine said early this year it will lift restrictions on tourism around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, formally opening the scene of the world's worst nuclear accident to visitors. Chernobyl's number-four reactor, in what was then the Soviet Union and now Ukraine, expl

    It was truly a trial by fire — one that has now become part of Russia’s nuclear marketing message.  How Chernobyl made Russia the most safety-conscious nuclear proponent. The NYT reports.

  • Bill Miller

    Here's what you should be watching Wednesday, March 23.

  • Deere Sees Itself Doubling in Size Over 8 Years: CEO Tuesday, 22 Mar 2011 | 3:49 PM ET

    Heavy-machinery company Deere still sees itself doubling in size over the next eight years, due in large part to construction and agriculture in Asia, the corporation’s CEO, Samuel Allen, told CNBC Tuesday.