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Weather Natural Disasters

  • Weather Channel to Name Winter Storms

    Would you take a storm more seriously if it was named after a Greek god? The Weather Channel thinks so, feeling it will be easier for folks to track the storm and get the word out on social media.

  • Lloyd's Good Fortune

    John Nelson, chairman of Lloyd's of London, says the drop in the level of major catastrophe losses, following a historically disastrous 2011, helped Lloyd's return to profit.

  • A forest burns during a backburn operation to fight the Wallow Firen in Nutrioso, Arizona.

    Your best business plans can go up in smoke if you're not planning now for the 'worst case scenario,' says this blogger.

  • Drought Sparks Historical Commodity Rally: Expert

    A look at why commodity prices are skyrocketing as a result of this summer's drought, with Jason Roose, U.S. Commodities analyst.

  • A forest burns during a backburn operation to fight the Wallow Firen in Nutrioso, Arizona.

    Colorado Springs officials say hundreds of homes have been destroyed by a raging wildfire that has encroached on the state's second-largest city and threatened the U.S. Air Force Academy.

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    Tropical Storm Debby spun drenching rains Monday over northern Florida as it hung nearly stationary over the Gulf of Mexico, making its biggest threat flooding rather than winds.

  • Federal Crop Insurance Fraud Costs Millions

    In East Tennessee, a "natural disaster" is staged to get federal crop insurance. Another farmer in California claims desert scrub land as a wheat field. As the crop insurance program expands, fraud is likely to increase. With CNBC's Scott Cohn.

  • Japan has given final approval for the restart of two nuclear reactors, a move that will end a total shutdown of the atomic power sector caused by safety fears raised by last year’s crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi plant. The FT reports.

  • hurricane_US_200.jpg

    This year's Atlantic hurricane season is expected to produce a normal number of tropical storms, with up to eight becoming hurricanes, forecasters say. But beware: All it takes is one big one.

  • 120509_Missing_Jet_Takeoff_200x150.jpg

    A new Russian passenger plane went missing in Indonesia while on a demonstration flight arranged for potential buyers. Fifty people were on board, including diplomats, businesspeople and journalists.

  • Flooded containers in Klong Luang on the outskirts of Bangkok, Thailand.

    Hundreds died and businesses lost billion in last year's floods, caused in part by overflow from dams filled to hedge against drought. This year, Thailand is testing different prevention measures. The CSM reports.

  • fx_fix_1_200.jpg

    Indonesia's quake hits the rupiah and Cambodia tries to de-dollarize - it's time for your FX Fix.

  • Large tornado hits Johnson County, TX

    As many as a dozen twisters touched down in a wrecking-ball swath of violent weather that stretched across Dallas and Fort Worth Wednesday.

  • Zombie

    There's a new zombie in town — sun-eye zombies, and they're a brain-eating byproduct of solar flares. Would you know how to survive them? That's the question you'll be asked in "Surviving the Coming Zombie Apocalypse," an online college course that uses a zombie apocalypse to examine human behavior amid catastrophe.

  • Tsunami hits Japan

    Last year's triple Fukushima disaster – an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis trifecta -- claimed more than 19,000 lives and wreaked utter havoc on the affected area. But the cascading effects of the Fukushima catastrophe may prove to be even more serious and long-lasting.

  • natural_gas_range.jpg

    A warm winter is chilling natural gas prices. A huge supply glut and warmer than normal temperatures are keeping natural gas prices at decade lows. For that reason, analysts say the year's lows could be yet to come and prices could break down through the $2 per million BTUs level, sometime this spring, before heading higher.

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    Natural gas futures were higher Tuesday, but analyst say the year's low may be yet to be seen as abundant supply and a warm winter keep the pressure on prices. In fact, some analysts say the price could break $2 per million BTUs before it moves higher.

  • Mining equipment is submerged by flood waters on January 6, 2011 in in the central Queensland city of Rockhampton, Australia.

    An Australian military aircraft on Friday was due to deliver needed supplies to a flood-stricken town hit by the worst of summer flooding in eastern parts of the country, with coal mining and agriculture also affected.

  • Under Armour Cools Down

    Under Armour is cutting its 2012 outlook for sales growth, blaming the mild winter for melting demand for its winter products, with James Duffy, Stifel Nicolaus.

  • An auto rickshaw or tuk tuk drives along a street in Bangkok on January 13, 2009. The tuk-tuk, so-called because of the noise it makes when it starts, has been adopted as a Thai symbol, it actually originates in Japan. The motorized version reached Thailand in 1959, and after a few technical and aesthetic modifications, it became the colourful, open-air vehicle seen careering across Thailand today.

    Thailand’s economy has the potential to grow at 7 percent in 2012, the country’s Deputy Prime Minister and Finance Minister, Kittirat Na-Ranong, told CNBC Friday. He added that the billions being spent this year on post-flood reconstruction projects would help boost the economy.