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    Japanese stocks are beginning to look cheap, according to Societe Generale Strategist Dylan Grice.

  • Yen coins and banknotes

    The G7’s agreement on joint action to push the yen lower has, so far, had the desired effect, reversing much of this week’s gain for the yen and boosting equities in Tokyo.

  • As the market begins the process of second guessing the G7’s coordinated action to keep the yen lower, High Frequency Economics is warning investors the damage caused by the disaster in Japan is being both understated by the government and underappreciated outside of people in the immediate vicinity.

  • Knee-jerk reactions to catastrophes often fall wide of the mark, Stephen King, chief economist at HSBC told CNBC.

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    Multinational companies in several sectors are warning of supply-chain disruptions, after the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis in Japan, the Financial Times reports.

  • In this satellite view, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power plant after the massive earthquake and subsequent tsunami.

    Readings from American flights over the stricken nuclear plant show that the worst of the contamination has not spewed past the 18-mile range established by Japan. The NYT reports.

  • Don't get too caught up in this rally, the "Mad Money" host said.

  • Japanese Self Defence Force's CH-47 Chinook helicopter holding more than seven tons water each with large buckets from the sea

    Better news from the Japan crisis today, as the nuclear power company Tepco appears to be on track to complete a power line to the Fukushima nuclear power plant this afternoon Tokyo time.

  • A factory building has collapsed in Sukagawa city, Fukushima prefecture, in northern Japan. A massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake shook Japan, unleashing a powerful tsunami that sent ships crashing into the shore and carried cars through the streets of coastal towns.

    Japan will get what it wants from the Group of Seven teleconference of finance ministers and central bankers Thursday night, but G-7 sources say the group is still waiting for Japan to ask.

  • A worker walks among rolls of semi-finished aluminum at the Alcoa aluminum factory in Szekesefehervar, Hungary.

    In the aftermath of Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami, many U.S. companies listed on the Dow 30 have offered various forms of aid to Japan's ongoing relief efforts. Read on to see how each company has contributed.

  • A local investor watches the share-prices index display at a stock brokerage in Shanghai.

    "Until investors know the extent of the damage and nuclear fallout in Japan, the only certainty in the capital markets is that uncertainty will prevail," one strategist says.

  • Following the disasters in Japan, trader Steve Cortes on Thursday said China is in "a lot of trouble." Here's how he recommends trading it.

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    While we await the outcome of the nuclear disaster in Japan, we could be witnessing a structural change in the global financial markets.

  • Traders point to Japanese investors repatriating assets as a significant cause of the yen's dramatic rise. Really?

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    This week's market action has left a lot to be desired. But given everything that is going on, we should probably be thankful. After falling some 4-5% from its recent highs, the S&P 500 remains in positive territory for the year.

  • An official in a full radiation protection suit scans an evacuated elderly woman with a geiger counter to check radiation levels in Koriyama city in Fukushima prefecture.

    Ever since the nuclear plants began deteriorating in Japan, there's been no shortage of coverage in the media. But it's been very hard to find anything on the bottom line: how bad could this get. If everything goes wrong, if we get multiple meltdowns, what happens? What's the worse case scenario?

  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY)

    Here's the transcript from my recent interview with top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell. One of the key points he made from my perch is that he wants a broad-based budget deal, but absolutely no tax hike.

  • Japan is Hawaii's second largest market for tourists behind the US mainland. Last year, 1.2 million Japanese came to the islands and spent $1.9 billion, according to the state tourism officials.  Now, all of this is threatened.

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    The yen rocketed to a postwar high against the dollar late Wednesday, and the market's showing little sign of calming today. It's time for your FX Fix.

  • Residential homes sit in front of the coal fueled Ferrybridge power station as it generates electricity in Ferrybridge, United Kingdom.

    As governments around the world rethink nuclear power, with fears rife about leaking radiation at Japan’s earthquake-damaged plants, Steen Jacobsen, chief investment officer at Saxo Bank, recommends investors focus on Russia to benefit from its energy potential.