Oil and Gas Natural Gas Prices

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  • A worker walks toward a part of a Consol Energy Horizontal gas drilling rig exploring the Marcellus Shale.

    To Find out, Cramer goes “Off the Charts.”

  • Agri Market Improving on Weather Concerns

    Tom Essaye, Editor, Money and Markets says things are improving in corn & soybean markets due to hot weather concerns.

  • Markey: Timeout on Nat Gas Exports?

    Rep. Ed Markey, (D-MA), explains why he thinks exporting natural gas could cause prices to skyrocket. "Natural gas is a domestic market, where oil is part of an international market," says Markey.

  • Coal fired power station

    Having suffered one blow from the Senate this week, King Coal faces another one from the EPA next week.

  • Chesapeake's C-Suite Shuffle

    A look at how to play the shakeup at Chesapeake's board, with Tim Rezvan, Sterne Agee analyst.

  • Cramer: Statoil Has Great Yield, Great Growth

    Mad Money host Jim Cramer sees a few glimmers of hope in the oil industry, including Statoil. Bill Maloney, Statoil Executive VP of Development & Production of North America, discusses his company's "very good position" in Norway, its partnership with Chesapeake Energy, and an outlook on natural gas.

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    President Obama has said the U.S. has a supply of natural gas to last nearly 100 years. But it turns out geologists and other researchers disagree on that supply figure, which has huge implications for America's energy policy.

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    U.S. energy producers' ability to pull natural gas from shale may have contributed to a price-dampening oversupply for now, but it’s also triggering tens of billions of dollars in capital investments.

  • OriginOil-unit-200.jpg

    The U.S. natural gas boom has kicked off a gold rush among companies trying to cash in on minimizing the industry’s environmental footprint.

  • nat_gas_drilling_fracking_200.jpg

    Natural gas's real potential for economic impact lies in the vast reservoirs of shale gas that are newly accessible through hydraulic fracturing.

  • fracking_oil_haliburton_1_200.jpg

    Amid cries for energy independence, fracking has become crucial to taking advantage of previously untapped resources. Take a closer look at hydraulic fracturing, and why the technology has become so important and controversial.

  • AEP-Sporn-200.jpg

    Environmental issues aside,  the economics of natural gas may have already dethroned coal as the nation's key source of electrical power.

  • Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, forces natural gas and crude oil out of shale buried deep below the earth by using highly pressurized and treated water.The idea of fracking dates back to the 1860’s. But modern fracking really started in 1947 and with technological advancements in the past 15 years, it’s become a standard industry method to access natural gas in particular.To say that fracking is a controversial method would be an understatement. While many industry analysts argue it is it a s

    While many industry analysts argue that fracking is a safe and efficient way to tap a bountiful energy source, many environmentalists disagree.

  • Anti-fracking-protest-NY-200.jpg

    There’s ongoing concern about potential health risks associated with natural gas fracking. More communities are publicly opposing the drilling activity, while the industry maintains the technology augers needed energy and manufacturing jobs.

  • TexasNaturalGas2-200.jpg

    Natural gas has often taken a backseat to crude oil in the Texas energy business, but the advent of fracking shale gas has given it star billing in the Lone Star State — and the nation.

  • nat-gas-hydraulic-fracking-200.jpg

    The natural gas industry may be hurting from rock-bottom prices now but if allowed to fully exploit the shale-gas boom, there may be few losers and many winners in the years to come.

  • better-your-business-train-200.jpg

    Heated debate over the impact of  liquefied natural gas exports on domestic prices is threatening to derail them at a crucial time for the U.S. industry.

  • Men work on a natural gas valve at a hydraulic fracturing site.

    It's almost impossible to overestimate the importance of fracking to the natural gas industry and the nation. It's also difficult to understate the controversy surrounding the environmental issues.  Our special report, "Who's Winning the Natural Gas Game?," addresses both

  • natural-gas-burning-200.jpg

    Other countries have invested billions in alternative fuels, from Brazil's government-sponsored soybean-ethanol push to France's headlong expansion of nuclear power after the oil shocks of the 1970s. Should the U.S. do the same? 

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    The proliferation of fracking and the likelihood of a long-running, shale-gas boom are destined to make winners and losers out of a lot of industries beyond the energy sector.