Oil and Gas Natural Gas Prices

  • John-Fredriksen-200.jpg

    Shipping magnate John Fredriksen is investing billions in rigs and tankers—despite weak petroleum and global economic forecasts, Oilprice.com reports. So what's fueling his giant bet?

  • A makeshift emerald mine in The Panjshir Valley, Afghanistan.

    Officials and industry experts are worried that the potential wealth to be made from Afghanistan's resources has increased the level of corruption, violence, and intrigue in the country.

  • Gold to Hit $2000: Pro

    Sean Hyman, Editor of Moneynews, Ultimate Wealth Report says stimulus from China and Europe are enough support to take commodities higher. Gold will hit $2,000.

  • Gazprom

    The bottom line is that the same natural gas revolution in the US, which was enabled by hydraulic fracturing (fracking), is now threatening to loosen Gazprom’s noose on the EU, and Gazprom simply won’t have it.

  • Boone T. Pickens

    The U.S. has the natural resources to one day stop importing OPEC crude oil, Boone Pickens, founder of BP Capital, told CNBC’s "Street Signs" on Monday.

  • Coal Plant

    Much progress has been made to cut pollution, but the list of most polluted states  is likely to contain the usual suspects next year and fewer improvements.

  • Real estate developer Donald Trump blames President Obama for the rising price of oil, warning, "this country can never, ever recover" if oil prices continue to go up.

  • A worker pumps gasoline into a car.

    Nothing infuriates Americans more than volatile, spiking gasoline prices. But often the causes given for gasoline price hikes seem contrived.

  • An oil drilling rig in the Junin 10 field in the Orinoco Oil Belt, in Anzoategui, Venezuela on January 24, 2012.

    Energy investors remain bullish on ExxonMobil, even though the outlook for oil prices remain uncertain, two analysts told CNBC.

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    Three big intertwined but rival agribusinesses — corn farmers, meat and poultry producers, and biofuel refineries — are in a political fight to protect their interests as a drought ravages corn producers and industrial consumers alike, the New York Times reports.

  • An international oil tanker passes through the Suez canal in Ismailia, Egypt.

    The United States is increasing its dependence on oil from Saudi Arabia, raising its imports from the kingdom by more than 20 percent this year, even as fears of military conflict in the tinderbox Persian Gulf region grow, the New York Times reports.

  • Raytheon's Silent Guardian Protection System

    Gulf states are planning to use ray guns to protect their oil and gas infrastructure and also dissuade pirate attacks.

  • oil_new_4.jpg

    The International Monetary Fund said Syria was one of the few countries in the Middle East whose economy is expected to contract in 2012. The IMF expected the regional economy to grow by more than 5 percent in 2012, an increase from last year. Economic problems for Damascus were compounded last week when the U.S. government extended sanctions on Iran to include the Syrian energy sector. Washington said the government in Damascus was generating millions in revenue through gasoline sales to Iran. With few political or military options available, economic warfare may be the best option for an international community frustrated with the bloodshed.

  • Oil refinery and petrochemical complex, Mahshahr, Iran,

    Iran has struggled to find a reliable consumer base given international sanctions pressure, and its recent production levels suggest the Islamic republic is retreating somewhat from the international energy sector.

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    A major oil find by Canada’s Tethys Petroleum in Tajikistan comes at a bad time for the Central Asian country, as the security situation is about to skyrocket out of control in a restive province on the border with Afghanistan.

  • The coal fueled Fiddlers Ferry power station emits vapour into the night sky on November 16, 2009 in Warrington, United Kingdom.

    The promise of discovering a clean, green, safe, and (due to the fact that it is fueled by the most abundant metal and gas on the planet, nickel and hydrogen) cheap renewable energy source is causing many investors and scientists to overcome their previous reluctance and enter the field.

  • US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton delivers a speech on August 8, 2012 at the University of the Western Cape in Cape Town. Clinton urged South Africa to build on icon Nelson Mandela's legacy and flex its growing influence on the global sticking points of Syria, Iran and Zimbabwe.

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in the midst of an 11-day trip across sub-Saharan Africa. Speaking on 1 August on the topic “Remarks on Building Sustainable Partnerships in Africa,” Clinton at the University of Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar, Senegal, Clinton told her audience, “The Obama Administration’s comprehensive strategy on Sub-Saharan Africa is based on four pillars: first, to promote opportunity and development; second, to spur economic growth, trade, and investment; third, to advance peace and security; and fourth, to strengthen democratic institutions.”

  • natural-gas-burning-200.jpg

    Natural gas futures soared more than 5 percent on Thursday after a government report showed storage levels rose last week by a smaller amount than many analysts had expected.

  • Gas Pump

    Retail gasoline prices in the U.S. Midwest were as much as 50 cents higher than in the rest of the country this week, and a number of contributing factors are to blame.

  • chesapeake_flag_200.jpg

    The natural gas and oil exploration company delivered earnings that fell short of Wall Street's expectations but its revenue topped forecasts.