Top News & Analysis New Mexico

  • On the waterfront: Market Street Bridge and the Tennessee Aquarium

    Chattanooga has made a comeback over the last 5 years thanks to investing in high-speed broadband. In the process, it has wooed $4 billion in foreign investment.

  • A construction crew fixing aging water pipes in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Federal and state funding cutbacks are challenging Main Street. The future of America is at stake since cities contribute more than 90 percent to GDP.

  • View of downtown Oakland, California.

    Interest rate swaps - sold as a way to save money on public financing - have turned into municipal bombs.

  • Lawrence Payne walks past two abandoned houses on September 4, 2013 in the Six Mile Gratiot neighborhood of Detroit, Michigan.

    The head of the National Urban League outlines a plan to close the economic divide that's crippling U.S. cities.

  • New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie

    New Jersey’s standing in America's Top States for Business has declined since Gov. Chris Christie took office in 2010. It finishes 42nd this year.

  • Chicago, Illinois

    New Hampshire, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and California fill out the list with the biggest drops in our America's Top States for Business rankings for 2013.

  • A worker makes denim jeans in Michigan.

    Unions say right-to-work laws infringe on workers’ collective bargaining rights, and proponents call for a federal law as opposed to the current patchwork of state statutes.

  • Traffic in Hawaii.

    Life's not always a beach in Hawaii: The Aloha State is ranked as America's Worst State for Business in America 2013.

  • An engineer and electrician working in Cambridge, Mass., May 23, 2013

    More than a couple of states can make a case for most-improved status in the areas of Economy, Infrastructure, Workforce and Business Friendliness.

  • South Dakota soars to the top spot in CNBC's annual survey of the Top States for Business. What other surprises are in store?

  • A welder builds parts for finished petroleum tanks at Southern Tank and Manufacturing in Owensboro, Kentucky.

    Which are the top states for the creation manufacturing jobs? Here's the countdown.

  • An Alpha Oil & Gas crew building a 10-inch gas pipeline near Watford City, N.D.

    When we launched Top States for Business in 2007, North Dakota was nowhere on the list. Now it's growth and employment numbers are the envy of the nation.

  • CNBC has been ranking all 50 states for competitiveness since 2007. This year's report comes as states continue to get back in fighting shape—fighting for jobs, that is.

  • CNBC scores all U.S. states on 55 measures of competitiveness and 10 categories, from the cost of doing business to technology and innovation.

  • The USDA is likely to approve a horse slaughtering plant in New Mexico in the next two months, which would allow equine meat suitable for human consumption to be produced in the United States for the first time since 2007. The NY Times reports.

  • Eric Schmidt

    Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt is selling roughly 42 percent of his stake in the Internet search company, a move that could potentially net the former chief executive a $2.51 billion windfall.

  • Japan Airlines

    Japan Airlines said it will talk to Boeing about compensation for the grounding of the 787 Dreamliner, adding that the idling of its jets would cost it nearly $8 million.

  • SANTA FE, N.M.-- An oil refinery in New Mexico will pay a $400,000 fine in a settlement over safety violations stemming from an explosion that killed two employees and injured two others.

  • Texas- based oilfield services company Baker Hughes Inc. reported Friday that 1,408 rigs were exploring for oil and 416 were searching for gas. Of the major oil- and gas-producing states, Texas dropped seven rigs and New Mexico fell by 5. Alaska and Oklahoma lost three apiece, and West Virginia was down by two.

  • ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.-- Nearly all of New Mexico continues to grapple with some level of drought, and federal forecasting models show those conditions are likely to persist through January. State and federal officials reported during a drought monitoring meeting Thursday that there has been only one day of rain so far this month in the eastern half of New Mexico.