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  • WASHINGTON, Nov 4- When Ajay Ahir agreed to come to the United States, he had no idea the recruiter promising a high-wage welding job and legal residency in America was lying. He borrowed 500,000 rupees to pay the recruiter's fees, told his wife to wait for him in India, and set off to make his fortune. After that visa expired and Eagle went out of business, the U.S....

  • Nov 3- CBS Corp, owner of the most-watched U.S. CBS, home to shows such as "Homeland", "The Affair" and "NCIS: New Orleans", said revenue from affiliates and fees from subscriptions together rose 9.2 percent in the third quarter. Net income from continuing operations rose to $426 million, or 88 cents per share, in the third quarter ended Sept 30, from $72 million, or 13 cents per...

  • Nov 3- CBS Corp, owner of the most-watched U.S. CBS, home to shows such as "Homeland," "The Affair" and "NCIS: New Orleans," said revenue from affiliates and fees from subscription together rose 9.2 percent in the third quarter. Net income from continuing operations rose to $426 million, or 88 cents per share, in the third quarter ended Sept 30, from $72 million, or 13 cents per...

  • Canal Street is flooded a day after Hurricane Katrina blew through August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    Ten years after Hurricane Katrina, photographer Mario Tama revisited locations that he captured in 2005.

  • A Truck bearing New Orleans Saints logos during Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans, 2014.

    In September 2006, the New Orleans Saints marched into the Superdome for their first game since Katrina, and provided the spark for a revival.

  • Revelers party in the French Quarter on Mardi Gras Day, March 4, 2014 in New Orleans.

    Hurricane Katrina may have washed away New Orleans' booming tourism sector, but 10 years later, the city's hospitality industry is standing strong.

  • A transformed New Orleans

    CNBC's Scott Cohn reports from New Orleans,10 years after Hurricane Katrina, on the progress in rebuilding where homes once stood. Moody's says New Orleans is economically stronger than it was before Katrina.

  • Katrina: The long road home

    CNBC's Scott Cohn reports from New Orleans, 10 years after Hurricane Katrina, on progress made in the "Road Home" program.

  • Katrina: Ten years later

    CNBC's Scott Cohn takes a look back at Hurricane Katrina - the costliest disaster in U.S. history - and assess the decade-long recovery in New Orleans.

  • Canal Street is flooded a day after Hurricane Katrina blew through August 30, 2005 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    New Orleans levee system failed in 50 places after Hurricane Katrina. CNBC's Scott Cohn reports on the more than 100 miles of levees and flood walls strengthened and rebuilt 10 years later.

  • Ochsner's Rise After Katrina

    In a post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans, hospitals like Ochsner Baptist Medical Center prepare themselves for the worst case scenario.

  • The reinforced levee stands in the Lower Ninth Ward, on July 22, 2015, in New Orleans.

    The New Orleans levees are better than they were when Katrina struck, but preparing for hurricanes is riddled with uncertainty.

  • Fire boat response crews battle the blazing remnants of the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico on April 21, 2010.

    A U.S. court said BP deserves the right to appellate review of some damage claims awarded in connection with the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

  • Andrew Liveris, chairman and chief executive officer of Dow Chemical Co.

    Former Dow CEO Andrew Liveris is accused of using his position to finance his lifestyle and boosting a charity that burnished his fame in Greece.

  • In this handout provided by the Orleans Parish Sheriffs Office, OPSO, Robert Durst poses for a mugshot photo after being arrested and detained March 14, 2015 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

    New York real estate scion Robert Durst's HBO finale would likely be admissible evidence in a murder trial, legal experts said on Monday.

  • Mardi Gras goes on despite weather

    NBC News' Jay Gray reports on the big business of Mardi Gras from New Orleans, despite colder weather this year.

  • Marriott launches first AC hotel

    Arne Sorenson, Marriott International CEO & president, discusses Marriott's new hotel brand designed to attract young, design conscience, tech-enabled travelers to urban properties. The new hotel is in New Orleans.

  • Health workers don protective equipment at the Island Clinic in Monrovia, Liberia.

    The Louisiana state health department wants doctors who treated Ebola patients to keep away from an upcoming tropical disease conference.

  • At a dinner for media, McDonald's offered fine cuisine dishes as part of a campaign to shake its reputation for serving cheap, unhealthy food.

  • Business travelers spent less money per trip in the second quarter, but it wasn't because prices went down, according to a new report.