Asia Top News and Analysis North Korea

  • U.S. Dollar

    The dollar looks sad, US stocks look okay and the econony starts looking "half-full."

  • Firefighters from the Incheon Fire and Safety Management Department inspecting the damage caused by the artillery shells fired by North Korea on November 24 in Yeonpyeong Island, South Korea.

    North Korea fired artillery shells at a South Korean island, killing two soldiers and two civilians, in one of the heaviest attacks on its neighbor since the Korean War ended in 1953.

  • Stocks declined, but ended significantly off session lows, as financials gained and the dollar slipped, although investors remained concerned about the effectiveness of Europe's attempt to contain sovereign debt troubles.  HP and Home Depot fell, while AmEx and BofA rose.

  • Stocks came back from session lows as financials gained, although the market remained lower amid continuing fears about Europe's ability to harness a credit crisis despite a weekend bailout agreement for Ireland. HP and Home Depot fell, while AmEx and BofA rose.

  • Stocks sank Monday as a strong start to the December holiday shopping season failed to counter investor concerns about the wider implications of debt burdens throughout Europe even as a final agreement was reached on Ireland's bailout fund. HP and Boeing slumped, while Bank of America rose.

  • U.S. stock index futures slid deeper into negative territory ahead of the open Monday as a final agreement on Ireland's bailout fund failed to lift investor sentiment.

  • Stocks finished the week lower Friday during a shortened trading session amid lingering uncertainty surrounding Europe's debt worries and a warning from North Korea.

  • Stocks were under pressure during a shortened trading session Friday amid lingering uncertainty surrounding Europe's debt worries and a warning from North Korea.

  • Stock index futures pointed to a 1 percent drop at the open Friday ahead of a shortened post-holiday session, as investors fled from risk on worries that euro zone debt problems may continue to spread.

  • Shoppers leave a store on 'Black Friday' in New York City.

    As shoppers hit the stores this Thanksgiving weekend, investors are likely to keep bidding up retail stocks even as some of those stocks hit multi-year or even all-time highs.

  • Stocks finished the session sharply higher Wednesday ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday, following a handful of reports that offered some hope that the U.S. economy was improving.

  • Stocks were trading sharply higher Wednesday following a handful of reports that offered some hope that the U.S. economy was improving.

  • Smoke rises from South Korea's Yeonpyeong island near the border against North Korea. Dozens of artillery shells fired by North Korea hit the South Korean Island of Yeonpyeong reportedly causing injuries and prompting return fire from South Korean forces.

    In the last 24 hours, many commentators have remarked upon the threat posed to financial markets by yesterday's Korean artillery exchange.

  • Stocks added to gains Wednesday after a handful of economic reports pointed to an improving economy.

  • Stocks were poised to open higher Wednesday after reports on the labor market and consumer spending pointed to an improving economy and as investors shifted their focus away from tensions between the two Koreas and European debt worries.

  • Traders sit in front of their screens at the stock exchange in Frankfurt/Munich, western Germany.

    Financial bookmakers expect to see Europe's top indexes rising on Wednesday, with resource-related shares finding support in rising metal and commodity prices.

  • Stocks ended sharply lower Tuesday amid concerns the Irish debt crisis would spread to other euro zone countries and the effects of the crisis in Korea prompted investors to dump risky assets. Microsoft and JPMorgan fell, while HP rose.

  • North Korea's attack on South Korea was "symbolically important," but will not lead to all-out war, Richard Kim, head of Korean sales at Auerbach Grayson, said on CNBC Tuesday.

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    Stocks are getting ripped by North Korea and Ireland, with all the fears that go along with those two stories. People should not panic. A lot of good news out there is suggesting a strong economy, regardless of what the Fed says.

  • Stocks continued to sink as the dollar rose Tuesday as investors grew skittish about the prospects of the Irish debt crisis spreading to other periphery euro zone countries as well as escalating tensions in Korea. Chevron and Exon fell, while HP rose.