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Exchanges NYSE

  • 3par_300.jpg

    A person close to the HP camp says that Hewlett Packard continues to bid for 3PAR because it believes an acquisition is beneficial to its strategy, and not because it is trying to simply demoralize Dell.

  • Stocks struggled to hold gains Friday amid some mixed economic reports. So what can you do to boost your portfolio ahead of next week? Benny Lorenzo, CEO of Kaufman Brothers, and David Stepherson, senior portfolio manager at Hardesty Capital Management, shared their best plays.

  • Stocks rose Friday after a reading on economic growth came in better than expected. Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS Financial Services, and Peter Costa, president of Empire Executions and CNBC market analyst, discussed their market outlooks.

  • Hewlett Packard raised it's bid for 3Par to $30.00 a share, or about $2 billion on Friday. This comes after Dell matched HP's previously increased bid earlier this morning.

  • Then And Now: New Orleans Five Years After The Katrina Disaster

    The Katrina anniversary is all about contrasts. More than one resident has called it a tale of two cities and, as cliched as that phrase may be, it certainly applies here.  Unemployment is below the national average, but poverty is twice the national rate.

  • Hewlett Packard

    Hewlett Packard raised its bid for 3Par to $27.00 a share, a value of $1.8 billion on Thursday.

  • This is a contested situation where you want to maintain being the superior bid. Dell is clearly saying that 3PAR is a strategic asset for the company because of its cloud-based storage.

  • Stocks have fallen almost 4 percent this month after a 7-percent gain in July. So what’s next and how do investors play it? Charles Carlson, CEO and portfolio manager of Horizon Investment Services, shared his best plays.

  • For those who fear stocks and bonds, take a look at closed-end funds, said Maury Fertig, CIO of Relative Value Partners.

  • Stocks climbed higher Thursday, after a report showed jobless claims fell last week. Does this mark an end to the pullback? Jeffrey Kleintop, chief market strategist at LPL Financial, and Bill Smead, CEO and CIO of Smead Capital Management, discussed their insights.

  • Hindenburg

    Last week's second Hindenburg Omen occurrence only intensified concerns many investors have about the current state of the stock market. It's believed that two Hindenburg Omen occurrences within a 30-day period can trigger this type of disaster in the stock market. ...A report from TheStreet.

  • Out of Work

    People will gain a sense of confidence and spend when they get "goods news on the sovereign debt front and a coherent articulation about how we are going to rebuild the economy coming from Washington," Parsons said.

  • The Dow pared losses Wednesday after falling below the 10,000 mark. How should investors prepare their portfolios? Michael Church, president of Addison Capital, and Erik Ristuben, CIO at Russell Investments, shared their insights.

  • A master limited partnership (MLP) of ETFs (electronically traded funds), which debuted Wednesday and will be traded on the Big Board, gives investors “liquidity and transparency” and a “tax-free” attractive yield, Kenny Feng, president and CEO of Alerian Capital, told CNBC Wednesday.

  • Stocks opened lower for a fifth straight day Wednesday following a disappointing durable-goods report. Joseph Keating, EVP and CIO at CenterState Bank, and David Hefty, CEO of Hefty Wealth Partners, discussed their market outlooks.

  • This is different from the period we saw where "activists were pushing to break-up companies, leverage up companies. This will be a different twist with potentially x amount of cash is enough," Leon Kalvaria, global head of consumer healthcare at Citigroup, told CNBC on Tuesday.

  • Oil prices fell for a fifth day Tuesday. Should you invest in oil as a physical commodity or in oil stocks? Darren Gacicia, vice president and equity analyst at Dahlman Rose, and Jerry Castellini, president and CIO of CastleArk Management, shared their insights.

  • With the markets lower for the fourth trading session, are we headed for a double-dip? David Kelly, chief market strategist at JPMorgan Funds and Sandy Lincoln, investment strategist at M&I Investment Management shared their insights.

  • The Dow tumbled more than 150 points Tuesday after a report showed a sharp drop in existing-home sales, confirming the market's worries about the recovery. Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS Financial Services, discussed his insights.

  • moynihan_brain_t_200.jpg

    A regulatory filing shows Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan has bought 30,000 shares of common stock in the company, a possible signal to Wall Street that the executive believes BofA's stock is undervalued.