Exchanges NYSE

  • Upside option activity exploded in the XHB homebuilder exchange-traded fund when the market surged yesterday afternoon.

  • Microsoft launched its newest software program—Windows 7—on Thursday, aiming to win back customers and strengthen its grip on the PC market. So will the new operating system roll a lucky 7 for the software giant? Katherine Egbert, tech analyst at Jeffries & Co. and Molly Wood, executive editor at CNET.Com shared their views.

  • Approximately 35 percent of S&P companies having reported so far so what do the results tell us for stocks going ahead? Neil Hennessy, portfolio manager and CIO of Hennessy Funds and Steven Stahler, president of Stahler Investment Group shared their market outlooks.

  • Bond investors need to think like lenders, because their money needs to be productive, said Bill Larkin, portfolio manager at Cabot Money Management.

  • Much like the U.S., Europe took a drubbing in the global economic crisis. Afterward, the region’s economy continued to limp along while other less-developed markets surged ahead to unprecedented growth. But the tide is shifting: analysts feel upbeat once again about Europe’s prospects. Why?

  • If the market continues at its current pace since the March lows, it could hit 1,280 on the S&P by the end of the year, said Laszlo Birinyi Jr., president of Birinyi Associates. He shared his market insights.

  • Momentum could push oil toward $90 a barrel in the shortterm, but an increase in supply from Nigeria and Iraq will place downward pressure on the commodity come spring 2010, said Michael Lynch, president of Strategic Energy & Economic Research.

  • Profits and sales were down for another quarter at UPS, but investors will be looking ahead to the upcoming holiday season to see if the world's largest shipping carrier—and the U.S. economy—are on the road to recovery. Arthur Hatfield, transportation analyst at Morgan Keegan, shared his analysis of UPS.

  • Raytheon is scheduled to report earnings this morning, and traders are positioning for a move lower.

  • The CBOE Volatility Index, considered the measure for fear in the market, dropped to just above 20 on Wednesday. Should investors be paying attention to the figures? Lincoln Ellis, managing director at the Linn Group and J.J. Burns, president of J.J. Burns & Co. shared their market insights.

  • Although he predicts commercial vacancy rates won't peak until 2011, Joe Rodriguez, portfolio manager of the 5-star rated AIM Select Real Estate Fund, said commercial real estate still offers investment opportunities.

  • Some investors wonder whether the Dow 10,000 has become the new support level. Additionally, the CBOE Volatility Index, widely considered the best gauge of fear in the market, dropped to just above 20, the first time since August 2008. Jerry Webman, senior investment officer and chief economist at OppenheimerFunds and Mike Rubino, president of Rubino Financial shared their market outlooks.

  • Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said that the Obama administration will end some of the TARP programs by the New Year. What does this mean for the financial sector? Mark Lane, equity research analyst at William Blair & Co. and Fred Cannon, co-director of research and chief equity strategist at KBW shared their insights.

  • Yahoo shares are up after the Internet company reported its profit more than tripled in the third quarter. But the stock's real potential to move depends on something else. Steve Weinstein, senior analyst at Pacific Crest Securities, shared his insights with CNBC.

  • The Dow bounced back on Wednesday after a quick drop at the market open. So how should you be invested? Tommy Williams, president of Williams Financial Advisers, and Joe Heider, president of Dawson Wealth Management, told investors where they see opportunities in this market.

  • Investors digested a mixed bag of earnings on Wednesday and left people wondering if the economy is still on its way to a recovery. Bob Doll, vice chairman and global CIO of equities at BlackRock, shared his market outlook.

  • Stocks opened lower on Wednesday as a slew of firms beating earnings estimates failed to generate much market momentum. Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS Financial Services, shared his insights.

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    "I really believe that the industry has bottomed, that we're not going to see further crashes in home prices or in home sales," banking analyst Dick Bove told CNBC.

  • Eastman Kodak is down 60 percent in the last month, and the options are looking for further declines.

  • Producer prices index dropped by more than what economists had expected and housing starts rose less than anticipated. So what does this mean for the American economy going forward? Steven Wieting, director of economics and market analyst at Citigroup and Michael Pento, chief economist at Delta Global Advisors shared their outlooks.