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    How should you play the second half? David Sowerby of Loomis Sayles and Brett D'Arcy of CBIZ Wealth Management offered CNBC their market outlooks and favorite investments.

  • Options trading turned bullish on this chip equipment maker as at least one investor positioned for a near-term pop in the shares. Which company is it?

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    Job cuts by America's private employers were worse than expected in June — but planned layoffs fell for a fifth consecutive month. What's it mean for stocks? Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS, offered CNBC his market insights.

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    Stock markets are set to log their best quarter in 10 years. Should investors pour their money into equities? David Tice, market strategist at Federated Investors, offered CNBC his investment advice.

  • Options action turned bearish on Nokia Tuesday, as traders positioned for the cell phone maker to lose at least a quarter of its value.

  • "People still need their coffee fix, despite the tough economy," said David Tarantino, analyst at Robert W. Baird & Co.

  • As we face the second half of 2009, how should investors play financials? Dick Bove of Rochdale Securities offered CNBC his take on bank stocks.

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    The Dow keeps experiencing minor pullbacks. As the quarter ends, is the big correction finally coming? Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS, offered CNBC his stock-market outlook.

  • The major indexes ended trading up Monday. How should you read it? Art Cashin, director of floor operations at UBS Financial Services, joined CNBC Monday afternoon to offer his stock-market outlook.

  • What will the second half bring? Neil Hennessy of the Hennessy Funds and Linda Duessel of Federated Investors offered their market outlook and investment advice.

  • Having a weak dollar isn’t necessarily a bad thing for the U.S. Although it might negatively impact the performance of certain exchange traded funds (ETFs), there are many items that could go in the positive column for this situation as well.

  • Friday's stock gains were a fluke, according to Philippe Gijsels of Fortis Global Markets. He offered CNBC his market outlook through the next two quarters.

  • Buy these solid stocks that pay while you wait, said Joseph Keating, of RBC Bank. He shared his best stock picks with CNBC investors.

  • Worried you missed the latest run-up and now stocks are trading sideways? Don't fear—you can still get in the game. Donald Yacktman, president of Yacktman Asset Management, and Kent Croft, CIO of the Croft Value Fund, share their value plays for the second half of the year.

  • U.S. consumer confidence rose in June to the highest since February 2008, but the question is: When are consumers going to spend a lot more to give the economy a turnaround? John Faucher, senior analyst at JPMorgan Chase and Linda Bolton Weiser, managing director at Caris & Co. said there are consumer stocks that investors ought to own right now—and a few to avoid.

  • Investor Spring Cleaning - A CNBC Special Report

    Stocks declined on Friday as investors shrugged off a surge in consumer sentiment, instead focusing on the fact that consumers are saving their money at a feverish pace. In another encouraging sign for the economy, KB Home reported a wider-than-expected loss but said that the housing decline is moderating. So are the “green shoots” back? Experts discussed the above and more…

  • Brunswick has rallied 15 percent in three days, causing one big investor to bet that the debt-laden speedboat maker may have run too far.

  • Investors should look to buy into banks that don’t need to raise further capital, but avoid those that do, Clem Chambers, CEO of ADVFN, told CNBC Friday.

  • Shares in British Airways, which struck a deal with thousands of workers to either work for free for a month or accept pay cuts and unpaid leave to pull the flag carrier, shot up nearly 3 percent in London Friday.

  • Barclays Capital released a report in March for the third quarter saying there are 'green shoots' in the US economy. Larry Kantor, head of research at Barclays Capital told CNBC the reasons behind the thinking.