Hardware Office Electronics

  • Google's big app offer to workplaces

    Discussing Google's plan to make workplace communication easier, beating Microsoft, and the problem with legacy contracts, with Amit Singh, Google for Work President.

  • Tracking the buzz about Hewlett-Packard's split

    Antonio Neri, senior vice president and general manager at HP Enterprise Group, discusses the announcement that HP will formally divide into two publicly-traded companies by November 1.

  • Companies – even new ones – appear to be skipping out on capex, but that spending may just not get counted because your kid is playing with it, UBS said.

  • Stewart Butterfield, co-founder and CEO of Slack

    The virtual office has made communications among far-flung teams tough, but this business app lets people share data from any device.

  • David Walsh, CEO of GENBAND

    Phone-based customer service could soon improve, thanks to this company, whose aim is to provide a better, faster call-center experience.

  • Xerox

    Xerox reported a slightly better-than-expected quarterly profit as expenses declined 4 percent.

  • An attendee tries the Canon Inc. EOS 7D Mark II digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera during its unveiling in Tokyo, Japan.

    Canon reported a slight rise in profit thanks to a weak yen, even as its camera business struggled to attract photographers.

  • An attendee tries the Canon Inc. EOS 7D Mark II digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera during its unveiling in Tokyo, Japan.

    Japan's Canon reported a slight rise in profit thanks to a weaker yen, even as its camera business struggled to attract photographers.

  • More headwinds ahead for Hewlett-Packard?

    Tim Bajarin, President at Creative Strategies, says the tech giant is is facing very strong competition in servers.

  • Modems and routers are bigger energy hogs than laptops and cell phone chargers. On a national scale, it’s pretty staggering: $1 billion a year in electricity.

  • Playing With Big Data

    What’s the next economic revolution? According to General Electric Chief Economist Marco Annunziata, it’s the “industrial Internet” — intelligent machines such as jet engines, power turbines and medical devices.

  • The Triumph of Politics

    In Europe, China and America, the major determinants of economic and market performance in the year ahead are political, not economic.

  • Vanquishing Software Viruses and Maybe Your Rivals

    The startup  Bromium is taking a completely new approach to  security software, using virtualization technology. But will it shake up the $60 billion market?

  • Video Game Industry: No Rules Left to the Games

    The video game industry is under attack, with both established and new players chasing a variety of disparate technologies and strategies that might yield a winning combination.

  • Disruptors Reinventing the Retail Marketplace

    While there’s been an explosion of apps and websites bringing retail online, the latest wave of innovation is focused on bringing mobile technology into brick-and-mortar retailers.

  • As Some Thrive on Disruption, Others Strive to Survive It

    Staving off a disruptive competitor is difficult. Just because a company’s disruptive nature gives it an advantage doesn’t mean its reign will last forever.

  • corning-gorilla-glass1-200.jpg

    Gorilla Glass is, well, not your ordinary glass. It's also an example of how advanced manufacturing can drive  innovation, efficiency, cost-savings and job creation.

  • iPad3 Release for Steve Jobs' Birthday

    CNBC's Jon Fortt reports Apple's release of the new and improved iPad3 set for February 24th, 2012.

  • Movies have glamorized many occupations over the years. The films of Humphrey Bogart let viewers live vicariously as street-smart private eyes. James Bond made audience members imagine themselves as debonair, globe-hopping spies with exotic seductresses in every port of call. And Clint Eastwood’s westerns made people visualize themselves as the frontier’s messengers of bloody vengeance.What these films failed to do was accurately convey a picture of their main characters’ day-to-day finances. Wa

    CNBC.com considered how famous movie characters made their living. We found what their salaries would be in real life, then determined if they could really afford to live in that apartment, drive that car, or eat at that restaurant.

  • Employees who call in sick normally get most of the blame for lost productivity, but a phenomenon known as “presenteeism” has been gaining notice, as well. Defined as the act of coming in to work when you’re sick and doing a third-rate job as a result, presenteeism costs businesses billions of dollars a year in lost productivity.If presenteeism is damaging to businesses, then it would stand to reason that the workplace would be better off if sick workers stayed home until they got better. When t

    Coming in to work when you’re sick costs businesses billions a year in lost productivity, but many workplaces can make employees sick. Here are 10 ways that your work may be killing you and your employer.