On the Money

401(k) Fallout
Teresa Ghilarducci, "Rescuing Retirement" author
Preparing for retirement is increasingly a do-it-yourself project. With just 13 percent of private employers providing pensions, amidst questions about Social Security's future, Americans are increasingly dependent on their employer's 401(k) plans. But 40% of workers have less than $10K in these accounts and not everyone has access to one. Economist Theresa Ghilarducci says she has a bipartisan, public-private solution.

Detroit Auto Show
Phil Lebeau, Reporter
As U.S. automakers continue breaking annual sales records, the big question at this year's Detroit Auto Show is where will new vehicles be made? President-elect Donald Trump wants more of those jobs created in the U.S., not overseas. Since then, Fiat Chrysler announced plans to invest $1B in Michigan and Ohio plants. And Ford cancelled plans to shift some SUV production to Mexico. With new vehicles in high demand, Phil LeBeau shows us some of the latest models.

Assembling IKEA
Lars Petersson, IKEA US President
Since starting in Sweden in 1943, IKEA has sold tables, bookshelves, sofas and more that you put together yourself. With 43 stores and more than 13,000 employees in the U.S., IKEA is bringing some of Scandinavia's generous social model here. After working at IKEA for just a year, all employees are now eligible for 3 months paid parental leave and 4 months if you've worked for IKEA 3+ years. We ask IKEA US President Lars Petersson what's next for the world's largest furniture retailer.

Closing The Gap
Sallie Krawcheck, Ellevest CEO & co-founder
While women control 80 percent of consumer spending and comprise more than half the workforce, the world of investing is still male-dominated. About 86% of financial advisors are men. Former Wall Street executive and entrepreneur Sallie Krawcheck has a new book called "Own It: The Power of Women at Work." She explains why women don't have to act like men to advance in the work place, and her take on the gender investing gap.

Mobile Travel Agent
Paul English, Lola co-founder and CEO
Travel agent jobs have vanished since websites like Expedia, Kayak and Priceline have let you plan and book your own trip. But Kayak's co-founder created a new travel app that uses real, live travel agents to do the work. Lola is a messaging app and personal travel service that books hotels, flights through its mobile text service. We ask Lola co-founder and CEO Paul English how it works and if the cost is worth the time saved.

Next Week: We welcome a new president. What will the next four years mean for your money?


Guest Interviews

  • A new IKEA store under construction in Florida. The furniture giant said Monday that after the three deaths of three children it is no longer selling its "Malm" series products.

    The furniture retail giant explains to CNBC its U.S. growth strategy.

  • A former top ranking Wall Street exec explains to CNBC the financial gaps women face compared to men.

  • 401(k) fallout

    Some 40% of workers have less than $10K in these accounts and not everyone has access to one. Economist Theresa Ghilarducci says she has a bipartisan, public-private solution.

  • Detroit auto show

    With new vehicles in high demand, Phil LeBeau shows us some of the latest models.

  • Assembling Ikea

    We ask IKEA US President Lars Petersson what’s next for the world’s largest furniture retailer.

  • Mobile travel agent

    Lola co-founder and CEO Paul English explains his new messaging/personal travel app works and if the cost is worth the time saved.

  • Closing the gap

    Sallie Krawcheck, Ellevest CEO & co-founder, explains why women don’t have to act like men to advance in the work place, and her take on the gender investing gap.

  • Home office

    The traditional 9am to 5pm job and long commutes are becoming a thing of the past, the CEO of Flexjobs explains to CNBC.

  • A trader wearing a Dow 20,000 hat works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

    Changes to retirement strategy should be made on the basis of fundamentals rather than Trumponomics, Wall Street veteran Jim Paulsen said.

  • Affordable fitness

    With new technology, big gyms say they’re now able to provide the custom workouts that only expensive boutique fitness studios have been able to offer. Using fitness trackers, they say private workouts including Pilates, Zumba and even kickboxing can be affordable. With CNBC's Diana Olick.

  • January bargains

    January is the best time of the year to buy items including flat screen TVs, fitness equipment and more. Retail expert Trae Bodge shares what you should look for and where you can find the best deals.

  • Build a budget

    With the holidays over, and those bills coming due, how can you build a budget? While it sounds like a daunting task, personal finance expert Farnoosh Torabi has a step-by-step plan to get your finances under control.

  • Dow 20K, Trump & your retirement

    Should the Dow 20K milestone change what you’re doing with your retirement savings? We ask Wells Fargo Chief Investment Strategist, Jim Paulsen for tips on what you should do with a new President about to take office.

  • Working the border

    U.S. Customs and Border Protection is looking for more than 1,700 new federal agents. Reporter Kate Rogers goes to the Border Patrol Academy in New Mexico to see what new recruits will have to tackle from fitness tests and combat training, to off-road driving.

  • Work perks

    As more companies offer flexible work arrangements, more workers are getting the opportunity to shape their schedule. Does it help companies in recruiting, and could you get the perk at your job?

  • Making a pledge to improve your finances this year is easy. Keeping it is harder. Financial advisors tell you how to hit those targets.

  • Gluten Free

    Thrive Market, which sells non-perishable healthy foods at reasonable prices, will ship customer orders within two days to 85 percent of the country.

  • New Year in Tech

    Ahead of next week’s Consumer Electronics Show, there are new gadgets you may not have heard of, and didn’t know you can’t live without. Two top tech writers bring cool new electronic items, any or all could be the “next big thing” in 2017.

  • The new year means new resolutions. While many of us make goals to lose weight, it’s also important to get financially fit. It’s the perfect time to take steps to tackle debt, improve that credit score and save more. Personal finance expert Lynette Khalfani-Cox has tips on financial goals to make that you can stick with all year long.

  • Airport upgrade

    Severe weather has slammed parts of the country, forcing some travelers to spend more holiday time in airports than planned. But a new J.D. Power survey found satisfaction with U.S. airports is at an all-time high. Reporter Phil LeBeau has which airports came out on top, and which have the most miserable ratings.

  • Organic delivered

    Healthy foods can come at a steep price. But start-up Thrive Market says it can provide organic food at a reduced cost. For a $60 annual membership they say they can deliver a box of healthy foods within two days at 25% to 50% below retail prices. We ask Nick Green, Thrive Market co-founder how the numbers work.

  • Return policy

    An estimated 30% of online holiday sales are returned. We’ll give you tips on how to avoid the hassle and get the most value for that unwanted gift.

About On the Money

  • On The Money is a half-hour weekly series that brings you the latest in market and economic news that impacts your money, with interviews with newsmakers, market strategists, and entrepreneurs.

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