Intellectual Property Patents

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    This is the story of the most successful—and least known—whistleblower operation of all time.  Four men who have made a vast fortune blowing the whistle on the drug industry, forcing Big Pharma to pay the federal government over a billion dollars in settlements.

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    Bradley Birkenfeld once lived the high life as secret Swiss banker at UBS in Geneva. Then he delivered some of the world’s best-kept secrets to the US government, expecting a great reward. And now he sits in federal prison in Pennsylvania.

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    Cheryl Eckard became the largest individual whistleblower award recipient ever, hauling in a $96 million bounty as her reward for providing information to the government about manufacturing problems at GlaxoSmithKline.

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    Have you ever been tempted to blow the whistle on something suspicious you've witnesses in the workplace? Take our poll and share your opinion.

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    Forget what you think you know about lone whistleblowers taking on giant corporations all by themselves. These days, there's a cottage industry to support—and profit from—whistleblowing.

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    When President Barack Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform act into law last summer, very few in the financial industry knew that the bill included a massive change in the way whistleblowing law works in this country.

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    That promise of cash is providing a new incentive for employees to reveal wrongdoing in their companies. What would you do?

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    Wall Street is suddenly paying attention to the culture of whistleblowing, because the new Dodd-Frank financial reform law, for the first time, extends whistleblower provisions to Wall Street, meaning employees who expose fraud and wrongdoing stand to collect between 10 and 30 percent of the amount recovered by the government.

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    Taking a look at the biggest fraud cases of all time, and you're left with just one question: What's wrong with the pharmaceutical industry?

  • One investment research firm thinks so. With strong options activity and shares surging, the "Fast Money" team weighs in.

  • Cramer explains how the bears griping could actually help your portfolio in the long run.

  • Paul Allen

    Shares of Google and Apple edged higher in pre-market trading after a federal court judge dismissed a patent lawsuit against the tech giants brought by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.

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    The New York Jets' Darrelle Revis is among a number of athletes who are seeking federal trademark protection for their names, nicknames and even their catchphrases, the New York Times reports.

  • Allen Stanford

    Newly released documents detail 12 years of fits and starts at the Securities and Exchange Commission as financier Allen Stanford was allegedly running a global Ponzi scheme.

  • Models walk the runway during SCFASHION Qi Gang 2011 S/S Collection at China Fashion Week on October 30, 2010 in Beijing, China

    Paris, Milan, New York, London...Beijing? Chinese designers would certainly like to see their runways join the ranks of the world's best, and they're using China Fashion Week, their annual showcase, to make a statement - from the bold to the bizarre.

  • Google Android

    Microsoft is suing Motorola for infringing on its smart-phone patents.

  • Sweetango apples

    A new breed of apple has been a hit with consumers lucky enough to find it. Cindy and Frank Femling, however, are among the growers who fear it could put them out of business.

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    There is no “quick fix” for cancer, no clear spot of light at the end of the tunnel. This cautious realization is that the fight against cancer is going to take more time than we thought.

  • Bernie Madoff

    Bernard Madoff, the author of the biggest Ponzi scheme in history, told inmates at the Butner prison where he is serving his 150 years jail sentence that his victims deserved what happened to them, because they were rich and greedy, according to an article in New York Magazine.