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Biotech and Pharmaceuticals Pharmaceuticals

  • Lipitor Goes Generic

    The generic version of Lipitor will begin shipping today. Insight with Paul Bisaro, Watson Pharmaceuticals president/CEO.

  • Unusual Activity: VRUS

    A look at the heavy call buying in Pharmasset, with Jon Najarian.

  • Cramer: Five Reason to Own Abbott Labs

    In a special Salute to the Troops episode of Mad Money, Jim Cramer introduces his father, Ken Cramer, a World War II veteran, and gives investors five reasons they should protect their portfolios with shares of Abbott Labs.

  • Amylin CEO on Exenatide

    Dan Bradbury, Amylin CEO, discusses paying Lilly $250M upfront and $1.2B of future sales for the rights to Exenatide, the once weekly version of diabetes drug, Byetta, that's pending FDA approval.

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    The pharmaceutical company reported third-quarter profit and revenue above analyst forecasts on Friday, and said it expected mid-sigle digit revenue growth  for the full year.

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    Is legislated healthcare reform here to stay? As we watch the presidential race heat up – and look to a Supreme Court ruling this summer — no one knows for sure. Regardless, we as a nation need to realize that traditional thinking around healthcare is forever changed.

  • Will Allergan Raise It's Guidance?

    David Pyott, Allergan chairman/CEO, discusses the company's earnings, and products in the big pharma pipeline, with Mad Money's Jim Cramer.

  • Eli Lilly CEO on Q3 Results

    A breakdown of the pharma giant's earnings, with John Lechleiter, Eli Lilly chairman/president/CEO, who shares where the company is seeing revenue growth.

  • Johnson & Johnson

    Johnson & Johnson's third-quarter profit fell 6 percent becuase larger overhead and production costs and a one-time charge offset higher foreign sales.

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    Investors should purchase pharmaceuticals shares in firms such as Roche, AstraZeneca, Novartis, and GlaxoSmithKline, James Bevan, CIO at CCLA Investment Management, told CNBC Friday.

  • Counterfeit prescription pharmaceuticals are widely recognized as a growing public health risk and a serious concern to public health officials, private companies, and consumers. This slideshow presents a shortened overview of the longer report,  In some countries around the world, counterfeit prescription drugs comprise as much as 70% of the drug supply and have been responsible for thousands of deaths in some of the world’s most impoverished nations, according to the World Health Organization

    Counterfeit prescription pharmaceuticals are widely recognized as a growing public health risk and a serious concern to public health officials, private companies, and consumers. Learn more.

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    Counterfeit prescription pharmaceuticals are a growing trend, widely recognized as a public health risk and a serious concern to public health officials, private companies, and consumers.  In this CNBC.com special report, we take an in-depth look at the world of counterfeit pharmaceuticals, from the dangers they pose and where they’re made, to what is being done to combat them.

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    Ten companies on the benchmark S&P 500 Index in the health-care and aerospace and defense industry have gained as much as 61 percent this year as the third quarter played host to a tumultuous 2011 for the stock market, reports TheStreet.com.

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    While new midlife parents may bring a special appreciation and years of wisdom to their postponed families, age-related hurdles can hit bank accounts and snag retirement and estate planning, requiring difficult decisions.

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    What if doctor's offices were like gym memberships? Pay a monthly fee and come as often as you like: no insurance, no deductible, no paperwork, no bill.  It's called direct primary health care and may be available in your state.

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    There's growing debate over whether America can afford Medicare as it is currently constructed and the costs sustainable.

  • Your Health, Your Dollars - A CNBC Special Report

    Critics of the Affordable Care Act say they are not seeing any change in costs and are worried that government-run health care will increase taxes and allow insurance companies to operate without rules.

  • Sphygmomanometer

    Many consumers assume that their health insurer, hospital, or state medical licensing agencies have vetted physicians who are open for business, but oversight is more lax than you might think.

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    What used to be mostly a matter of phony billing has spread to questionable medical procedures and identity theft, costing patients and insurers more than ever.

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    Though the U.S. had made much progress taking medical record keeping into the digital age, there's still some doubt that the government will reach its target by the prescribed deadline.