Autos

Phil LeBeau

Phil LeBeau
CNBC Auto and Airline Industry Reporter

Phil LeBeau is a CNBC auto and airline industry reporter based at the network's Chicago bureau. He is also editor of the Behind the Wheel section on CNBC.com.

LeBeau has reported one-hour documentaries for the network, including "Dreamliner: Inside the World's Most Anticipated Airplane," "Ford: Rebuilding an American Icon" and "Saving General Motors" and "Failure to Recall: Investigating GM," which won a 2014 Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW) Award.

Prior to joining CNBC, LeBeau served as a media relations specialist for Van Kampen Funds in Oak Brook Terrace, Ill., and was instrumental in implementing an initiative to communicate the company's mutual fund and investment practices to the public and the press. While at Van Kampen, LeBeau held a Series 6 license.

Previously, he held general assignment reporting positions at KCNC-TV, the CBS affiliate in Denver, and KAKE-TV, the ABC affiliate in Wichita, Kan. LeBeau began his career as a field producer at WCCO-TV in Minneapolis, where he wrote, produced and researched consumer stories. He graduated from the University of Missouri-Columbia School of Journalism with a bachelor's degree in journalism and broadcasting.

Follow Phil LeBeau on Twitter @Lebeaucarnews.

More

  • As more Americans go into dealerships to buy a new car or truck, they are increasingly stretching out their auto loans to at least five years in length, and often to six and seven years.

  • Vice chairman of Toyota Motor, Takeshi Uchiyamada (R), introduces the company's new compact electric vehicle called the 'eQ', at the company's showroom in Tokyo on September 24, 2012.

    Toyota has decided to cool off its once ambitious plans for developing electric cars.

  • Alan Mulally, president and chief executive officer of Ford Motor Co., speaks during the unveiling of the Ford Fusion in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Sept. 18, 2012. Mulally said he has no plans to retire from Ford Motor Co., the second-biggest U.S. automaker.

    Ford in the U.S. continues to grow profits and profit margins with a steady cadence of new and re-designed models. That will be the focus this fall even as reporters pepper Mulally with questions about his succession plans.

  • US President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign event at Eden Park September 17, 2012 in Cincinnati, Ohio. Obama said Monday he liked to 'walk the walk, not just talk the talk' on combating China trade abuses, in a sharp jab at his Republican foe Mitt Romney.

    It was classic American political theater in Ohio. President Obama, campaigning hard to win votes in a state where one out of every eight jobs is connected in some fashion to the auto industry, chose today to announce the U.S. has filed a trade case with the World Trade Organization against China.

  • Mark Fields, president of the Americas for Ford Motor Co., right, and Alan Mulally, the company's president and chief executive officer.

    The big challenge at Ford remains the mounting losses in Europe. They're already more than $500 million this year and could eventually reach $1.5 billion this year.

  • The Toyota logo is displayed on the grill of brand new Toyota RAV4s on the sales lot at City Toyota in Daly City, California.

    After three years filled with recalls, limited supply, and a much needed redesign, the Toyota Camry has become the top selling vehicle in the U.S. Experian Automotive analyzed new vehicle registrations during the first half of this year and found 209,000 new Toyota Camry's in the U.S. compared to 202,000 Ford F-150 pick-up trucks. A year ago, Experian listed the F-150 as number one ahead of the Camry.

  • Chevy Volt

    The folks at GM headquarters are not happy.

  • Retooling Ford For the Future

    CNBC's Phil LeBeau talks with Mark Fields, Ford Motor Company president, about the company's plans to build the next generation of automobiles.

  • Toyota Dealership

    As the auto industry rebounds in the U.S. it is creating a strong demand for engineers. In fact, one recruiter said the auto industry is seeking more than a thousand engineers.

  • Help Wanted!: Engineers

    CNBC's Phil LeBeau reports automakers are scrambling to hire engineers, as competition for skilled workers heats up.

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