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  • Viral philanthropy business model

    Sunil Gulati, Columbia University, and Jeff Bergstrand, University of Notre Dame Mendoza School of Business, discuss the impact of viral marketing on philanthropic organizations like ALS.

  • Ice bucket phenomenon shifting philanthropy?

    The ice bucket challenge has raised more than $22 million over the past three weeks, compared to $1.9 million during the same period last year. CNBC's Robert Frank discusses if this is a one-time gimmick or will change the business model of philanthropy.

  • Massachusetts Park Rangers take the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge in Boston.

    The challenge is successful because it's combined something that's real, tactile and fun—with social media and digital reach.

  • Kara Swisher takes the ALS challenge

    Technology journalist Kara Swisher accepts Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg's challenge to raise awareness for ALS.

  • CNBC's Jon Fortt & Michael Dell accept ice bucket challenge

    CNBC's Jon Fortt accepts the ice bucket challenge to raise awareness for ALS, and nominated Michael Dell. Kelly Evans reports ALS has raised $15 million this summer.

  • ALS raises over $13 million since July 29th

    CNBC's Andrew Ross Sorkin looks back on some of the best ice bucket challenge videos from last week, including from Bill Gates, saying the campaign has now hit China.

  • Scott Wapner gets iced after accepting the Ice Bucket Challenge!

    "Three weeks ago, half the population didn't know what ALS is," ALS Association Development Officer Lance Slaughter tells CNBC. "Now millions of people do."

  • Jim Cramer takes the Ice Bucket Challenge.

    CNBC's Jim Cramer donned his best suit to have a bucket of ice water poured over his head Thursday as part of the ALS ice bucket challenge

  • Governor Chris Christie

    New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie posted on his Facebook page a video showing two of his kids dumping a bucket of ice water on his head.

  • Republican politicians sued the SEC, seeking to throw out a rule that limits political donations by investment advisers.

  • A bedroom at the Highclere Castle, Newbury, England.

    Auction house Christie's is offering a night's stay at Highclere Castle, the setting for PBS's period drama Downton Abbey.

  • Dr Pepper Snapple giving back to America's kids

    Larry Young, Dr Pepper Snapple CEO, discusses the company's commitment to educate and encourage the nation's youth.

  • Oracle bridging the digital divide: Chairman

    Jeffrey Henley, Oracle chairman, discusses the company's participation in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education program and its focus to inspire and empower young people in the U.S. We primarily target kids at risk, says Henley.

  • Samaritan's Purse charity staff put on protective gear at the ELWA hospital in the Liberian capital of Monrovia.

    The US Peace Corps said it was withdrawing 340 volunteers from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea due to the spreading Ebola virus across West Africa.

  • A proposed dish for Rooster Soup Co.: “Pastramen” with soy-spiked double chicken broth, short rib pastrami, pickles, rye noodles and a soft-boiled egg.

    Rooster Soup Co. is an upcoming, crowdfunded nonprofit restaurant that will join the new class of eateries with a mission.

  • Don't confuse bull market with brains: Cooperman

    Leon Cooperman, Omega Advisors chairman & CEO, shares his winning investment strategy. The market is finally in a zone of fair and reasonable valuations, says Cooperman.

  • Bill Gates, Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett at a 2006 news conference announcing Buffett's plans to give billions to the Gates Foundation

    Warren Buffett's annual gift to the Gates Foundation is worth a record $2.1 billion this year, up from $2.0 billion last year.

  • In 1996, then-Baltimore Orioles shortstop Cal Ripken Jr. was on the American League All-Star team. Prior to the game, the players posed for their team photograph, and after it was taken, the platform on which they were posing buckled, throwing Roberto Hernandez of the Chicago White Sox off balance. While steadying himself, he accidentally hit Ripken in the nose with his forearm, breaking it.Ever the trooper, Ripken simply had his nose reset and went ahead and played the game anyway. If he hadn’t

    Hall of Fame baseball player Cal Ripken Jr., is in the Twin Cities, and speaks about honoring teachers from around the U.S., as well as his best advice for saving money.

  • Zack Brown told CNBC he never thought $10 potato salad campaign would reach $50,000, and counting. Now he vows to use leftover funds for "greater good."

  • Chen Guangbiao (C), Chairman of Jiangsu Huangpu Recycling Resources Co., Ltd, presents his company's product canned fresh air at Beijing Financial Street on January 30, 2013 in Beijing, China.

    A Chinese tycoon served up a fancy lunch Wednesday to the homeless at a Central Park restaurant, but caught grief from attendees expecting cash.

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