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Media Publishing

  • What's Apple's e-book endgame?

    Daniel Ernst, Hudson Square Research, provides perspective on Apple's battle with the government over allegations the company conspired to raise e-book prices.

  • Elle magazine unveils historic September issue

    Kevin O'Malley, Elle magazine svp, publisher & chief revenue officer, discusses the magazine's evolution into a multi-channel business by transforming from a magazine brand to a content brand.

  • For all the ruckus about fixing the newspaper business, the sad truth is that people just don't read the stories anymore. And you probably won't finish this one.

  • The New York Times building in New York City.

    The New York Times is not for sale, its controlling family and publisher have said, after a week in which both The Boston Globe and The Washington Post were bought out.

  • Bezos goes 'Post'-al

    Richard Brandt, "One Click: Jeff Bezos and the Rise of Amazon.com" author, talks about Jeff Bezos's deal to buy the Washington Post newspaper and what he will likely do with it.

  • Billionaires: New faces of 'newsies'

    CNBC's Julia Boorstin updates us on recent acquisition deals for trophy publishing assets by high-net-worth individuals. Steven Levy, Wired senior writer, provides insight into Jeff Bezos-Washington Post deal.

  • Amazon's Bezos buying Washington Post newspaper

    Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos is personally purchasing the newspaper for $250 million, reports CNBC's Julia Boorstin. And Rick Edmonds, Poynter Institute analyst, provides analysis of the future of print media and what Bezos will likely do with the brand.

  • Casey Anthony listens to testimony during her murder trial on June 30, 2011

    Casey Anthony has agreed to pay $25,000 to her bankruptcy estate to avoid having to write her life story.

  • Never ignore a stock that's fallen out of favor. What's unloved today can be a sweetheart stock tomorrow.

  • Rolling Stone may prove there's such thing as bad publicity as it likely won't be hurt by featuring one of the alleged Boston bombers on its August cover.

  • See why Rolling Stone is under fire for its new cover.

  • Senate reaches student loan deal: AP

    The Associated Press is reporting that the Senate has reached a deal on lower interest rates on student loans, reports CNBC's Seema Mody.

  • Beyond the front page with your smartphone

    Omar Tayeb, Blippar co-founder & CTO, explains how his new app allows readers to unlock extra digital content hidden beneath the pages of their favorite magazine or newspaper.

  • A federal judge's ruling that Apple conspired to raise e-book prices may not mean cheaper e-books for consumers. Prices were already dropping.

  • William Lynch Jr., CEO of Barnes and Noble,

    Barnes& Noble CEO William Lynch has resigned effective immediately, the U.S. bookstore chain said on Monday.

  • Author James Hollock, with copies of his first book, "Born to Lose."

    Amazon, which became the biggest force in bookselling by discounting prices, has started to cut back on some of its deals as competition wanes.

  • News Corp. CEO Rupert Murdoch.

    Rupert Murdoch belittled a British police inquiry into bribes allegedly paid by his journalists in a secret recording made by his staff, in sharp contrast to the profuse public apologies he made to defuse anger at news gathering practices.

  • The News Corp Spin-Off

    Rupert Murdoch's publishing and education company "Amplify" will remain a unit of News Corp, while its cable and movie assets unit will become "Twenty First Century Fox." CNBC's Julia Boorstin has the details.

  • Rupert Murdoch and his wife, Wendi Deng Murdoch

    News Corp chief Rupert Murdoch on Thursday filed for divorce from his wife of 14 years, Wendi, seeking to end a marriage that had been broken for more than six months.

  • Apple Executive Takes the Stand

    The highest-ranking Apple executive to testify will take the stand Thursday at the e-books price-fixing trial, reports CNBC's Jon Fortt.