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  • The corruption scandal at football's governing body doesn't involve entities under the soccer group's control, a former candidate for FIFA's top spot said.

  • A Qatari official stands near the FIFA World Cup trophy following its arrival in Doha.

    Qatar losing the right to host the FIFA World Cup is “within the realm of possibility,” Citi bank has said, with Wednesday’s arrests “bearish” for the Arab emirate’s banks.

  • Mount Street Christmas lights

    The Qatari royal family has bought yet another multi-million pound property in one of London's most affluent areas, according to a British newspaper.

  • Qatari royals on London spending spree

    CNBC's Phil Han reports on the recent purchase of a $60 million mansion by the Qatari royal family and the other properties in its portfolio.

  • Indonesian activists protest against the death penalty, in response to the execution of 2 Indonesian maids in Saudi Arabia.

    Indonesia has imposed a ban on any more of its domestic helpers from working in 21 Middle Eastern countries, but will the move backfire?

  • People attend Dutch National Tulip Day in front of the Royal Palace at Dam Square, in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

    Businesses can lower risk to their supply chains by setting up shop in these countries, a study says.

  • A KC-135 Stratotanker from Fairchild Air Force Base, Wash., refuels a B-1B Lancer during a training exercise Sept. 23, 2014, over South Dakota.

    As the U.S. reduces its military budget, Jim Cramer sees allied countries are arming themselves. This is good news for one group of stocks.

  • CNBC's Phil Han reports on the unexpected delay in the delivery of Airbus' brand new A350 aircraft to Qatar Airways.

  • The owner of London's Canary Wharf on Friday rebuffed a raised $4.1 billion bid from Qatar and a North American investor.

  • London Shard

    CNBC's Phil Han takes a look at which foreign governments are buying up big chunks of prime London real estate.

  • Oil workers conduct a drill in a petroleum well in Lagunillas at the east coast of Lake Maracaibo near Maracaibo City in Venezuela.

    Countries around the world that rely on oil revenues are bracing for an imminent economic and budget hit.

  • Workers at an oil facility near Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Oil could continue its deep slide, under new pressure from Saudi Arabia's decision to cut its selling price rather than cut production.

  • FIFA President Joseph S Blatter presents Qatar for the host of 2022 FIFA World Cup.

    The top soccer official in the U.S. wants to change the way FIFA, soccer's world governing body, does business.

  • Qatar has introduced reforms aimed at its migrant workforce following criticism of conditions at its sites for the 2022 World Cup.

  • Israeli soldiers ride on an armored personnel carrier outside the Gaza Strip.

    Before fighting in Gaza can end, Hamas may need to address a problem—its payroll.

  • Qatar needs to fully address criticisms: Pro

    James Dorsey, Senior Fellow at S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, discusses whether corruption and labor abuse claims could cost Qatar hosting rights for the 2022 World Cup.

  • Don't worry about overheating in Qatar economy

    Khalid Al Khater, Director, Department of Research and Monetary Policy at Qatar Central Bank, outlines how the government has taken steps to contain overheating in its economy.

  • Qatar has 'huge financial stability': CEO

    R. Seetharaman, CEO of Doha Bank, says Qatar has a history of financial stability with solid underlying economic fundamentals, and discusses the World Cup corruption allegations.

  • Will Qatar lose the 2022 World Cup?

    Kevin Carpenter, sports lawyer at Hill Dickinson, discusses the latest corruption allegations regarding Qatar's 2022 World Cup bid and the different options available to FIFA.

  • Qatar World Cup: Heat caused deaths before

    Mel Goldberg, solicitor at Mel Goldberg Law, discusses the Qatar 2022 World Cup and the FIFA investigation into corruption allegations.