Legislation Regulations

  • US Capitol Building with cash

    End the public lifeline for large financial institutions, Republicans are demanding as they push back against Democratic efforts to set new rules for the financial industry.

  • Shopper with Bloomingdales Bags

    At least now we know, thanks to Chicago Fed Chief Evans, that "unusually low for an extended period" means six months and not two years.

  • chart_scary.jpg

    Credit default swaps (CDS) will be looked at closely to ensure transparency but they aren't necessarily going to be banned, EU Financial markets commissioner Michel Barnier told CNBC.

  • Allen Stanford

    The federal judge in accused Ponzi schemer Allen Stanford's criminal case says he wants some answers before agreeing to Stanford's request for yet another new legal team.

  • Allen Stanford

    Victims of the alleged $7 billion Allen Stanford Ponzi scheme may get a greater voice in how what's left of their investments will be divvied up.

  • US Capitol Building with cash

    We are facing an across-the-board tax-hike assault from federal, state, and local sources. This, despite a precarious outlook of a return to long-term economic prosperity after an especially deep and painful recession.

  • Healthcare coverage and the hastle of forms

    Electronic health records are a good first step, but represent only one aspect of how IT can improve America’s healthcare system by making it seamless and safer, writes Chris Begley, Chairman & CEO, Hospira, Inc.

  • Timothy Geithner

    The financial reform bill is moving closer to guaranteeing two critical functions: that taxpayers will never again have to spend billions to rescue failing banks, and that institutions will never be considered 'too big to fail,' Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner told CNBC.

  • Galleon Group

    A former I.B.M.  senior executive pleaded guilty on Monday to providing confidential information about Advanced Micro Devices  and Lenovo to a friend who was a hedge fund consultant and an alleged participant in a wide-ranging insider trading scheme.

  • The SEC now has more staff with experience with complex financial products in the agency and has more financial crisis-related cases in the works, Mary Schapiro, chairman of SEC, told CNBC Monday.

  • Cost of healthcare

    Now that President Obama has rammed through his trillion-dollar gut renovation of U.S. health care, here are six provocative questions on what we have wrought.

  • Marijuana

    The smell of pot hung heavy in the air as men with dreadlocks and gray beards contemplated a nightmarish possibility in this legendary region of outlaw marijuana growers: legal weed.

  • Elizabeth Warren

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  • american_bank.jpg

    The White House is revving up its lobbying efforts to help Senate Banking Chairman Christopher Dodd win enough support in the full Senate for a financial reform bill, sources tell CNBC.com.

  • Mail delivery could be trimmed back to five days a week, a move that could save the postal service three billion dollars annually, officials say.

  • New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)

    For months, Wall Street banks and the troubled automakers feverishly protested that their top executives would flee if they were not lavishly rewarded for their talents. New data, however, suggests the departures were more of a trickle than a flood. The NYT explains.

  • Considering health care reform went through, can the Wall Street crackdown be far behind?

  • Sen. Christopher J. Dodd (D-CT) speaks at a news conference following the Senate's cloture vote on health care reform legislation on Capitol Hill.

    Senate Banking Committee Chairman Christopher Dodd (D-Conn.) finally unveiled his financial reform legislation. It was not worth the wait.

  • dart_dollar_200.jpg

    When Josh Beckett pitches for the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium, New York collects income tax on the portion of his salary earned in New York State.  But what about a Boston Scientific sales representative who comes to New York to pitch medical products to a new client? New York wants a slice of that paycheck, too.

  • American healthcare reform

    The day the President signs this into law could be viewed by a near-future generation of Americans as a day of infamy -- if we let it.