Legislation Regulations

  • Timothy Geithner

    Europe can survive the current economic crisis if its leaders make good on commitments to turn their economies around, Treasury Secretary Geithner told CNBC Wednesday.

  • The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has published its detailed economic analysis of the Greek restructuring program. It makes for truly grim reading.

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    Germany's ban on kinds of naked short selling will have no effect on investors' ability to bet on declining prices, analysts told CNBC.

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    The latest push for greater regulatory scrutiny of hedge funds may be a boon to the biggest, most established hedge funds and a blow to smaller fund managers.

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    I have spent the last 20 years of my life covering Wall Street, and I know there are plenty of good and decent investment advisors who do put their clients first. I also know that, as with any industry, there are less-than-honorable players just out to make a buck.

  • “Poor loan underwriting” and the cost of home loan providers Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to the federal budget have not been addressed in the Senate financial regulation bill, Bob Corker (R., TN) told CNBC Tuesday.

  • Cramer picks the biggest losers and winners of financial reform.

  • Here is part one of Cramer’s weeklong stock-market survival school.

  • Debtor Nations

    Call it the eurozone two-step.  That’s what the euro nations in distress will be asked to dance  on Tuesday as their ministers present their recovery plans to the body of 16 eurozone finance ministers engaged in an emergency meeting in Brussels.

  • Hint: Not US banks. Plus, who should GM pay back first?

  • Auto sales transaction

    The financial reforms being debated in the Senate have prompted resistance from a variety of businesses, but perhaps nowhere more intensely than in the already beleaguered auto industry, where dealers find themselves pitted against Mr. Obama in their aggressive campaign to exempt themselves from the new rules.

  • The probe into the financial meltdown has turned to hedge funds and what role they played in the crisis.

  • Massachusetts Secretary of State William Galvins sent a letter to 10 major banks on Friday concerning their exposure to municipal credit default swaps linked to bonds issued by the state's cities and towns.

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    The Senate has approved major items such as too-big-to-fail authority, Federal Reserve audits and larger capital requirements for banks, but major battles still loom.

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    the economy is in the throes of a V-shaped recovery. I've been saying that for months now. But is this recovery a temporary false dawn, or can we be confident it has legs? Will Washington's deficit-spending and debt-monetization policies be reversed, or is the soaring gold price a true negative signal for the future?

  • Senator Al Franken (D-MN)

    In the latest sign of the zeal in Congress to get tough on Wall Street, the Senate approved two initiatives on Thursday aimed at addressing the role that major credit rating agencies played in the 2008 financial collapse, including a proposal to end the reliance on companies like Moody’s Investors Service and Standard & Poor’s.

  • Former U.S. President Bill Clinton seen speaking during the inaugural Rural Summit in Washington, DC

    Former President Bill Clinton says it is "time to lower the rhetoric and talk about the facts," in reference to the government's scrutiny of Wall Street.

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    The European Cental Bank's bailout package is just a $1 trillion fig leaf covering the problem and a better move would have been to arrange for Greece and Portugal to leave the European Union.

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    Any assumption that the financial crisis is behind us is way off the mark, as the European Union is just shifting debt obligatoins between the public and private sector and not dealing with the undelying problem.

  • The three biggest credit agencies are now on the hook—along with eight Wall Street banks—in a probe involving whether they misled investors in toxic, mortgage-backed securities, CNBC has learned.