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Legislation Regulations

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    The Chairman formally known as everybody's favorite Uncle Ben stepped before Congress and said the economic outlook was "unusually uncertain." Sorry, but it's always unusually uncertain.

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    In nationwide surveys that were conducted in 2008 and 2009, the Pew Center found that 23 percent of Americans said that Hispanics were discriminated against “a lot” in society today.

  • I think the most “captivating” part of Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke was not what he said, but what he omitted. Yes, the unusually uncertain comment captured the essence of why businesses aren’t hiring with European debt crisis, health care, Fin Reg and taxes all creating the miasma.

  • Ben Bernanke, Federal Reserve Chairman

    Ben Bernanke threw a curveball Wednesday in his midterm report to Congress. The Fed view of the economy has been downgraded since its last report in February. This is not totally new news, since the June FOMC minutes reported this downgrade.

  • Cows waiting to be milked

    The funny, far-reaching business of regulatory reform. "I don't think anybody has read it," says cowboy Brett Crosby of the 2,300-page FinReg bill. "War and peace is only 1,400 pages, for crying out loud, and people don't even read that."

  • CNBC's personal finance expert Suze Orman talks about the financial reform bill and how it will impact your wallet.

  • Mark Shafir as seen on Strategy Session.

    On The Record with Citigroup's Head of Global M&A, Mark Shafir, about lessons learned from the financial crisis.

  • A slew of prominent companies are reporting Wednesday and Thursday, but the 'Fast' traders are waiting to hear what these names say.

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    The White House’s decision not to invite the chief executives of JP Morgan Chase and Goldman Sachs to today’s ceremonial signing of the financial overhaul legislation has many on Wall Street fuming.

  • Cramer talks to the Delaware Democrat about leveling the investing playing field for “the little guy.”

  • William O'Brien, DirectEdge's Chief Executive Officer

    Confidence in a stable, expanding economy and a stock market that is fair are key investor issues, William O’Brien, CEO of DirectEdge, told CNBC Tuesday.

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    $550 million looked like pocket change until Goldman Sachs earnings were announced today. Today's numbers, which missed analyst expectations, actually makes one think that Goldman is paying the price for last week's SEC action. Of course, their win was avoiding criminal action and other SEC regulatory activities as a result of the disastrous subprime mortgage placements.

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    Whereas critics of the US bank stress tests complained that there were too many details, the concern about European tests is that there are too few.

  • These offerings have both sizzle and steak.

  • Mort Zuckerman

    Unemployment benefits should be extended for humanitarian reasons, billionaire businessman Mort Zuckerman told CNBC Monday.

  • Crisis in the Gulf

    The US ban on offshore drilling could have long-term consequences on oil prices, Nobuo Tanaka, executive director of the International Energy Agency, told CNBC Monday, on the eve of the three-month anniversary of the BP  Gulf of Mexico oil spill that led to the moratorium.

  • Demonstrators from Code Pink for Peace hold photographs of Lloyd Blankfein, chairman and CEO of The Goldman Sachs Group, and demand he be jailed with other executives before a hearing of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Investigations Subcommittee on Capitol Hill.

    The final terms of Goldman Sachs' settlement with the SEC were hashed out over the telephone. On one end, Gregory K. Palm, Goldman’s general counsel. On the other end, the S.E.C.’s director of enforcement, Robert Khuzami.

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    Now that  the Senate has passed President Obama’s Wall Street reform legislation, the financial industry’s representatives are combing through the legislation and trying to figure out exactly who their new regulators in Washington will be.

  • The 2,330 leviathan is done and will be signed by President Obama next week. The bill leaves tremendous much of the rule making up to the big three: Federal Reserve, CFTC and SEC.

  • Goldman Sachs

    If the core banking franchise holds steady, the only real risk to Goldman's growth will be the cost of that expansion. Talent costs money, and hiring the best bankers could eventually weigh on Goldman's return on equity.